In this podcast interview, journalist Jennifer Lin discusses Christianity in China and her quest to uncover her family's Anglican past in Shanghaithe topic of her bookwith National Committee Senior Director for Educational Programs Margot Landman.

After the United States and China established diplomatic relations in 1979, those who had left China around 1949 were able to visit family members who had remained in China. Three decades of separation gave rise to many unanswered questions on both sides. One such question inspired young journalist Jennifer Lin: “Do you have any idea what happened to us?” she was asked at a family reunion in Shanghai in 1979. She then embarked on a 30-year quest to uncover her family history. The daughter of a Chinese father and a Catholic, Italian-American mother, Ms. Lin explored her family’s Anglican past in Shanghai, and its experiences as Chinese Christians under communist rule. The resulting book, Shanghai Faithful: Betrayal and Forgiveness in a Chinese Christian Family, is an account of China’s chaotic modern history through the eyes of a single family whose western education, charismatic leadership, and Christian faith made it targets during the Cultural Revolution. Ms. Lin joined the National Committee on January 24, 2018, in New York, for a discussion of her book, her family, and the recent history of Christianity in China.

Jennifer Lin is an award-winning journalist and former reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer; she served as the paper’s New York financial correspondent, Washington foreign affairs reporter, and Asia bureau chief in Beijing.

NCUSCR Interviews

The NCUSCR Interviews podcast series features one-on-one discussions between leading experts on China and National Committee staff. Regular releases cover a range of developing issues in politics, foreign policy, economics, security, culture, environment and areas of global concern.

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