• Public Event

    Richard McGregor discussed his new book The Party: The Secret World of China's Communist Rulers. Former Beijing bureau chief for the Financial Times (FT), Mr. McGregor illuminates the complex inner workings of the Chinese Communist Party and examines its influence over the military, local governments, and the Chinese people.

  • Public Event

    At a National Committee public program on May 19, author Michael Meyer discussed living in one of Beijing's oldest hutongs, a traditional alleyway neighborhood which defined the city's layout for centuries. Mr. Meyer's first book, The Last Days of Old Beijing, chronicles the destruction of many of these neighborhoods as the city was redesigned for the 2008 Summer Olympics.

  • Public Event

    Some 130,000 students from China now study a variety of fields in colleges and universities around the United States. What about the first Chinese students in this country? In a lecture and discussion at the Luce Foundation offices in New York, Edward Rhoads shared stories and research from his new book Stepping Forth into the World: The Chinese Educational Mission to the United States, 1872-81, which examines the individual and collective histories of the first 120 Chinese students in the United States.

  • Program

    Administered by the Committee from 1981 to 2015, the Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program sent American pre-collegiate and college-level educators to several cities in China for 4-5 weeks each summer. It offered an opportunity to gain valuable, first-hand insights into a country that has become an important element in American education across the curriculum. Through the intensive program of briefings and site visits, educators enhanced their ability to teach about Chinese culture, history, politics, economics, and other areas.

  • Public Event

    How do academics and journalists write about China? How might they draw upon each others’ work in order to give Americans a more accurate picture of developments – current and historical – in China?

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