Public Event
In the spring of 2011, The Visionaries, a non-profit educational organization that produces a PBS program by the same name, approached the National Committee to create a documentary on our work and history. Now in its 17th season and hosted by actor Sam Waterston, The Visionaries profiles not-for-profit organizations around the world and is broadcast by PBS stations nationwide.
Public Event
Prominent rights activist, legislator and professor Wu Qing joined the National Committee Vice President Jan Berris in a program co-hosted by the National Committee and Asia Society on December 12, 2012. A well-known public figure in China, Wu Qing has built a reputation as a fearless legislator, human rights activist – particularly on behalf of women, and dedicated teacher. Program Video:
Public Event
Some 130,000 students from China now study a variety of fields in colleges and universities around the United States. What about the first Chinese students in this country? In a lecture and discussion at the Luce Foundation offices in New York, Edward Rhoads shared stories and research from his new book Stepping Forth into the World: The Chinese Educational Mission to the United States, 1872-81, which examines the individual and collective histories of the first 120 Chinese students in the United States.
Public Event
Chinese in America endured abuse and discrimination in the late 19th century, but they had a leader and a fighter in Wong Chin Foo (1847–1898), whose story is a forgotten chapter in the struggle for equal rights in America. 
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Mary Brown Bullock, founding executive vice chancellor of DKU, discussed Duke Kunshan University in the context of the globalization of higher education.
Program
Launched when only a trickle of Chinese graduate students and scholars came to the United States for study, the Scholar Orientation Program was created to supplement academic training that Chinese scholars received at U.S. institutions by providing them with greater exposure to America's history, culture, and key institutions.
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Academic exchange with the People's Republic reached new heights as a U.S. delegation of university and college presidents visited China in 1974 and was received by then Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping.
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The National Committee implemented an exchange program that provided a forum for museum professionals, specialists, and government officials in China and the United States to share experiences and ideas on how museums can best engage young audiences and serve as educational resources.
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The Master Teacher China Seminar is a half-day of China programming for some of the top educators in the country.
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From 1981 to 2015, the National Committee administered a program on behalf of the U.S. Department of Education to bring delegations of educators and educational administrators from across China to the United States.
Program
Administered by the Committee from 1981 to 2015, the Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program sent American pre-collegiate and college-level educators to several cities in China for 4-5 weeks each summer. It offered an opportunity to gain valuable, first-hand insights into a country that has become an important element in American education across the curriculum. Through the intensive program of briefings and site visits, educators enhanced their ability to teach about Chinese culture, history, politics, economics, and other areas.
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Between 1996 and 2014, the U.S.-China Teachers Exchange Program, established with funding from the Freeman Foundation, sent American K-12 teachers to China and brought Chinese secondary school teachers to the United States.
Public Event
Gerard Postiglione discusses China's higher education model and its global ambitions in the Belt and Road era. 
Public Event
Dr. Ho discussed her new book, museum curation, and the narrative legacy of China's historical artifacts.
Program
Since 2004, the National Committee has been selecting twelve graduating U.S. high school seniors who have received national recognition for their accomplishments to participate in the yearly U.S.-China Student Leaders Exchange. For the young American participants, the heart of the program is a two-week study visit to China during the summer between high school and college. Americans participants learn about China's successes and challenges and have unusual opportunities to meet and exchange ideas with their Chinese counterparts as a consequence of homestays throughout most of the program.

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The National Committee on U.S.-China Relations welcomes financial and in-kind contributions. The Committee is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization and, as such, donations to it are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.