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Following a decision to bring greater transparency to process, the Chinese government started sending delegations abroad to give further clarification of policies adopted at the recent 17th Party Congress. While other delegations have been sent to Japan, Russia, the European Union and Southeast Asia, this particular delegation – with its three principal members having played instrumental roles in developing the policies for political reform that were set out at the Party Congress – came to the United States to give further explication to American China-watchers.
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Leadership changes announced at China’s 17th Party Congress are expected to give an indication of President Hu Jintao’s ability to consolidate his political power, as well as early signs of who may contend to succeed him as China’s top leader in five years’ time. Dr.
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On April 20, 2006, the National Committee co-hosted a dinner in Washington, DC in honor of Hu Jintao, president of the People’s Republic of China. This provided the occasion for President Hu’s only public address in Washington, DC.
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China has made great strides in introducing a modern body of law and legal institutions over the course of the past 30 years. In the process, it also has raised the legal awareness and expectations of its citizens. Yet the country still faces major hurdles in enforcing laws, ensuring an independent judiciary and facilitating the access of ordinary citizens to the legal system.
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Discussion with author David Shambaugh, professor of political science and international affairs, George Washington University.
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China’s judiciary is a key component in furthering development of the rule of law throughout the country. In recent years, the educational and professional standards of judges and the quality of judicial opinions have been raised, yet much work remains to be done in order to improve the administration of the courts, ensure enforcement of laws and judgments, and remove corrupt influences from the courts.
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The National Committee hosted a ground-breaking visit to the United States by a ten-person delegation focusing on human rights, philanthropy, and economics. Led by Huang Mengfu, chairman of the China Foundation for Human Rights Development, the group was in the United States (New York, Washington, D.C. and Boston) November 16 through 24, 2008. The visit came at an opportune time, closely following China’s announcement that it is drafting a national action plan to protect human rights.
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Dr. Ashley Esarey, An Wang Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University, and Dr.
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The National Committee welcomed Dr. Lai Shin-yuan, minister of Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council, for a roundtable discussion on July 13. Dr.
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The National Committee was delighted to welcome Zhang Jingjing to a roundtable discussion held on March 19, 2009. Ms.
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Professor A. Tom Grunfeld led a conference call discussion for National Committee members on April 16, which included a concise historical overview, a summary of the present situation in Tibet and consideration of the implications of recent events for U.S.-China relations and the Beijing Olympics.
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In honor of the 60th anniversary of the establishment of the People’s Republic of China, the National Committee is e-mailing its members and friends a series of “postcards” from China. The cards, intended to capture a sense of the proceedings in Beijing, come from friends of the Committee attending events, observing the activities around them, and reflecting on what they see and hear.
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Who are China’s leaders? How do they think? What are the implications for China’s future? Robert Lawrence Kuhn discussed his latest book How China’s Leaders Think: The Inside Story of China’s Reform and What This Means for the Future (John Wiley & Sons, 2009) on January 12. Kuhn draws on exclusive interviews with over 100 Chinese leaders, providing an insider’s view on what China’s current and future leaders think about trade, business, finance, media, diplomacy and more.
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The National Committee welcomed Christine Loh, the founder and CEO of Hong Kong think tank Civil Exchange, on February 8, 2010 for a roundtable discussion. In her opening remarks, Ms. Loh addressed five areas: the economy, civil society, Hong Kong government, Hong Kong-China relations, and perceptions of Hong Kong today. She then took questions on a wide array of issues.
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Professor Deborah Bräutigam discussed her new book, The Dragon’s Gift: The Real Story of China in Africa, at the offices of Jones Day in New York. The book examines Chinese aid and state-sponsored economic engagement in Africa.

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