Program
Following a cooling of relations in the early 1990s, the National Committee revitalized the U.S.-China military dialogue, sending a group of retired four-star generals and admirals to China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan in 1994 and 1996. Since then, the success of this program has continued to foster constructive exchange, in addition to inspiring other programs like the U.S.-China Strategic Security Dialogue.
Program
In 2002, a consortium that included the National Committee, The Asia Foundation, and Worldwide Strategies, Inc. was awarded a multi-year contract by the U.S. Department of Labor to run a set of programs to improve Chinese labor laws. The overall goals were to help strengthen the Chinese government's capacity to develop laws and regulations to implement internationally recognized standards of workers' rights, to promote greater awareness of labor law among Chinese workers and employers, to strengthen industrial relations, and to improve legal aid services to women and migrant workers. The National Committee's mandate was to work on legislative and labor inspection issues.
Program
The National Committee's Annual Members Program consists of two components: a substantive discussion on some important aspect of the U.S.-China relationship which is preceded by a business meeting open only to NCUSCR members.
Public Event
Eric Liu pieces together a sense of the Chinese-American identity at a time when China is emerging at the center of the global scene.
Public Event
At a joint program of the Committee of 100 and the National Committee  on December 11, 2008 Ambassador J. Stapleton Roy and Major General John Fugh shared the remarkable story of General Fugh's fulfillment of a promise to his father, to bury the ashes of family friend and diplomat John Leighton Stuart in his birthplace of Hangzhou.
Public Event
Philippe Le Corre discusses the current landscape of Europe-China relations, and his new book, China’s Offensive in Europe. 
Public Event
Jerome Cohen discusses the political, legal, and economic ramifications of the present situation in the South China Sea, and analyzes the drivers of geopolitical competition in the region.
Public Event
Every morning, the national security advisor briefs the president of the United States on the world’s most pressing security threats, from ISIS to the Zika virus. Our collective security is increasingly reliant upon cooperation between the United States and China, whether it is minimizing the risk of conflict in the South China Sea, dealing with North Korea’s nuclear weapons program, or responding to climate change. We explore these issues and more in a program featuring former National Security Advisors Richard V. Allen, Stephen J. Hadley, and Robert McFarlane in conversation with National Committee President Steve Orlins.
Public Event
Defense Secretaries Harold Brown, William Cohen, Chuck Hagel, and  William Perry, in conversation with National Committee President Steve Orlins, reflect on their experiences at DoD and the future of the U.S.-China security relationship.
Public Event
Professor Lucian Pye and Professor Robert A. Scalapino, two distinguished scholars in the field of U.S.-China relations who have served as National Committee chairmen, discussed the founding of the National Committee, its work over the past 40 years and the role it might play in the future at a May 3 anniversary program in New York City. National Committee chair Carla Hills welcomed the many current and former directors, members and guests who attended the program.
Public Event
Four former commanders of the U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM), in conversation with National Committee President Steve Orlins, reflect on their time as leaders of the largest military command in the world.
Public Event
At a Jones Day program on February 27, Dr. Nicholas Lardy addressed China's economic development in a discussion of his new book, Sustaining China's Economic Growth after the Global Financial Crisis (Peterson Institute Press, 2012).
Program
Started in September 1984 as an off-the-record gathering of leading citizens of China and America, the U.S.-China Dialogue was the first formal instance of Track II diplomacy in the Sino-American relationship.  It was held every 12-18 months, alternately in China and the United States, until 2002. 
Program
The National Committee’s involvement in congressional delegations to China was renewed shortly after China National Offshore Oil Corporation’s (CNOOC) attempted acquisition of UNOCAL failed due to congressional objections. This was a vivid reminder of the importance of the American Congress in U.S.-China relations and the valuable role that the National Committee could play in congressional leadership education.
Program
The eleventh annual CHINA Town Hall took place on October 24, 2017, at 86 venues across the United States and Greater China, and featured Ambassador Susan E. Rice, former national security advisor and U.S. ambassador to the UN, as the national webcast speaker.

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The National Committee on U.S.-China Relations welcomes financial and in-kind contributions. The Committee is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization and, as such, donations to it are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.