• Public Event

    Matt Sheehan describes his professional path, lending insight into non-traditional careers in the China space and the challenges and opportunities these paths present.

  • Public Event

    What does the future hold for Hong Kong? Will it become just another Chinese city that makes up the Greater Bay Area? The speakers, who have been tracking issues relating to higher education, journalism, protest, and the arts, address Hong Kong's future under Chinese rule.

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    CEO Gary Liu offers an exclusive look into Hong Kong’s newspaper of record, the South China Morning Post.

  • Public Event

    Dr. Maria Repnikova discusses her new book on the role of the media in China and what it means to be a Chinese journalist in the Xi Jinping era.

  • Public Event

    Jiayang Fan and Jeffrey Wasserstrom discuss mutual misunderstanding and fascination between Chinese and Americans.

  • Public Event

    Alexandra Harney examines some of the reasons why China is able to offer such low prices on its manufactured goods. She also highlights the consequences of the “China price,” including the health and safety of workers and environmental degradation.

  • Public Event

    How do academics and journalists write about China? How might they draw upon each others’ work in order to give Americans a more accurate picture of developments – current and historical – in China?

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    Ted Plafker is a Beijing-based correspondent for The Economist. In his book, Doing Business in China: How to Profit in the World’s Fastest Growing Market, he highlights promising economic sectors, provides information on China’s legal landscape, and offers advice on how to promote and distribute products to Chinese consumers, among other topics.

  • Public Event

    National Public Radio correspondent Rob Gifford traveled along China’s Route 312, from the dynamic metropolis of Shanghai to the remote border region with Kazakhstan. In China Road, Mr.

  • Public Event

    This public program examined had a “then and now” focus, as it examined how the work of foreign journalists in China has changed in the 35 years since the signing of the Shanghai Communique.

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