• Public Event

    Mycal Ford, Eileen Huang, and Dolly Li discuss the history of Black and Asian tensions and solidarity, the impact of “Yellow Lives Matter” on our communities, and tangible acts of solidarity that will help to bridge the divide between these two groups.

  • Public Event

    Jennifer Ho and John Pomfret discussed the history of anti-Chinese/Asian racism in the U.S., the impact of coronavirus-related racism, and the importance of uniting across our communities to stand up against all forms of discrimination.

  • Public Event

    The Buddhist monk Tanxu surmounted extraordinary obstacles--poverty, wars, famine, and foreign occupation--to become one of the most prominent monks in China, founding numerous temples and schools, and attracting crowds of students and disciples wherever he went. Now, in Heart of Buddha, Heart of China: The Life of Tanxu, a Twentieth Century Monk, James Carter draws on untapped archival materials to provide a book that is part travelogue, part history, and part biography of this remarkable man.

  • Public Event

    In The Silk Road: A Very Short Introduction James Millward explores the historical background against which the silk road flourished, discusses the significance of old-world intercultural exchange, and puts the silk road into the context of world history. Professor Millward will discuss the historical significance and contemporary uses of the silk road at a National Committee program on May 16 at the Institute of International Education in New York City. Click below for a podcast interview with James Millward:

  • Public Event

    At a National Committee public program on May 19, author Michael Meyer discussed living in one of Beijing's oldest hutongs, a traditional alleyway neighborhood which defined the city's layout for centuries. Mr. Meyer's first book, The Last Days of Old Beijing, chronicles the destruction of many of these neighborhoods as the city was redesigned for the 2008 Summer Olympics.

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