• Program

    In 1990, as Congress debated whether to renew trade benefits for China after the break over Tiananmen, the National Committee organized the first post-Tiananmen visit of a high-level Chinese delegation to the United States. Led by Shanghai mayor and future PRC premier Zhu Rongji, the delegation included former Shanghai mayor Wang Daohan and the mayors of Wuhan, Chongqing, Taiyuan, Hefei, and Ningbo — six of China's largest and most outward-looking cities.

  • Public Event

    The National Committee hosted a ground-breaking visit to the United States by a ten-person delegation focusing on human rights, philanthropy, and economics. Led by Huang Mengfu, chairman of the China Foundation for Human Rights Development, the group was in the United States (New York, Washington, D.C. and Boston) November 16 through 24, 2008. The visit came at an opportune time, closely following China’s announcement that it is drafting a national action plan to protect human rights.

  • Public Event

    On June 18, 2008, the National Committee co-hosted a dinner in Washington, DC, in honor of Wang Qishan, Vice Premier of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China. Informally concluding the 4th round of the U.S.-China Strategic Economic Dialogue (SED), the dinner provided the occasion for Vice Premier Wang and U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Paulson to give public addresses concerning SED’s progress.

  • Program

    The Master Teacher China Seminar is a half-day of China programming for some of the top educators in the country.

  • Public Event

    Professor A. Tom Grunfeld led a conference call discussion for National Committee members on April 16, which included a concise historical overview, a summary of the present situation in Tibet and consideration of the implications of recent events for U.S.-China relations and the Beijing Olympics.

  • Public Event

    Discussion with author David Shambaugh, professor of political science and international affairs, George Washington University. Audio of the event is available on the website of the Asia Society, the event co-sponsor.

  • Program

    China's rapid development and Sino-American relations have a direct impact on the lives of nearly everyone in the United States. CHINA Town Hall is a national conversation about China that provides Americans across the United States and beyond the opportunity to discuss issues in the relationship with leading experts.

  • Program

    In 2002, a consortium that included the National Committee, The Asia Foundation, and Worldwide Strategies, Inc. was awarded a multi-year contract by the U.S. Department of Labor to run a set of programs to improve Chinese labor laws. The overall goals were to help strengthen the Chinese government's capacity to develop laws and regulations to implement internationally recognized standards of workers' rights, to promote greater awareness of labor law among Chinese workers and employers, to strengthen industrial relations, and to improve legal aid services to women and migrant workers. The National Committee's mandate was to work on legislative and labor inspection issues.

  • Public Event

    China’s judiciary is a key component in furthering development of the rule of law throughout the country. In recent years, the educational and professional standards of judges and the quality of judicial opinions have been raised, yet much work remains to be done in order to improve the administration of the courts, ensure enforcement of laws and judgments, and remove corrupt influences from the courts.

  • Public Event

    The National Committee and the Asia Society cosponsored the premiere of Young & Restless in China, a documentary film that follows the lives of nine young Chinese over the course of four years.

  • Program

    With limited funds at their disposal, China's NGOs are increasing their human resource pool and engaging their communities by utilizing volunteers to fulfill their missions. It is within this context that the Strengthening Volunteer Management in Chinese NGOs project was developed in 2005, with the goal of providing Chinese NGO professionals practical training in volunteer management.

  • Program

    Despite differences in political traditions and practices, municipal government officials in the United States, mainland China, and Taiwan share interests in delivering services to citizens, promoting economic development, and managing government resources. Many have taken advantage of the Internet's capacity for fast, inexpensive communication and introduced innovative municipal websites.

  • Public Event

    China has made great strides in introducing a modern body of law and legal institutions over the course of the past 30 years. In the process, it also has raised the legal awareness and expectations of its citizens. Yet the country still faces major hurdles in enforcing laws, ensuring an independent judiciary and facilitating the access of ordinary citizens to the legal system.

  • Program

    The National Committee sends three bipartisian delegations of congressional senior staff members to China each year for a study tour to learn first-hand about issues impacting China and the U.S.-China relationship. Delegation members travel to Beijing and other regions of China to meet with counterparts working for China's central, provincial, and municipal governments, as well as with NGO leaders, academics, business leaders, and members of the media.

  • Program

    The National Committee regularly sends members of Congress to China, having arranged and escorted eight delegations since 2006. The week-long study tours are designed to educate the congressmen and women about China through personal introductions to senior Chinese leaders and a range of informative site visits and meetings.

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