• Supporting Material / Volunteer Management Tools / Strengthening Volunteer Management in Chinese NGOs
  • Supporting Material / Participant Information / Strengthening Volunteer Management in Chinese NGOs
  • Program

    With limited funds at their disposal, China's NGOs are increasing their human resource pool and engaging their communities by utilizing volunteers to fulfill their missions. It is within this context that the Strengthening Volunteer Management in Chinese NGOs project was developed in 2005, with the goal of providing Chinese NGO professionals practical training in volunteer management.

  • Public Event

    Jack Perkowski, chairman and CEO of ASIMCO Technologies, gave National Committee members and guests a snapshot view of his experiences in building an automotive parts business in China.

  • Public Event

    The December 2007 UN-sponsored Bali climate summit highlighted the main challenge to negotiating a post-Kyoto framework to address climate change: American and Chinese unwillingness to accept binding limits on greenhouse gas emissions. Specialists Rob Bradley and Joanna Lewis discussed U.S. and Chinese government approaches to international climate change negotiations, how the two countries influence each others’ policy formulation and potential openings for cooperation.

  • Public Event

    David Denoon, an economist and political scientist on the faculty of New York University, gave National Committee members and guests an overview of the key findings of his recently published study, The Economic and Strategic Rise of China and India: Asian Realignments After the 1997 Financial Crisis. This public program was held on the evening of January 8 in New York.

  • Public Event

    How do academics and journalists write about China? How might they draw upon each others’ work in order to give Americans a more accurate picture of developments – current and historical – in China?

  • Program

    Despite differences in political traditions and practices, municipal government officials in the United States, mainland China, and Taiwan share interests in delivering services to citizens, promoting economic development, and managing government resources. Many have taken advantage of the Internet's capacity for fast, inexpensive communication and introduced innovative municipal websites.

  • Public Event

    Concern about the safety of products imported from China has added a new source of tension to U.S.-China trade relations. In this off-the-record conference call with National Committee members, three specialists offered their analysis of how the current issue has developed over the course of the last several months, examined dynamics within China that contributed to weaknesses in quality control and considered the potential for a legislative response on Capitol Hill.

  • Public Event

    China has made great strides in introducing a modern body of law and legal institutions over the course of the past 30 years. In the process, it also has raised the legal awareness and expectations of its citizens. Yet the country still faces major hurdles in enforcing laws, ensuring an independent judiciary and facilitating the access of ordinary citizens to the legal system.

  • Public Event

    Ted Plafker is a Beijing-based correspondent for The Economist. In his book, Doing Business in China: How to Profit in the World’s Fastest Growing Market, he highlights promising economic sectors, provides information on China’s legal landscape, and offers advice on how to promote and distribute products to Chinese consumers, among other topics.

  • Public Event

    National Public Radio correspondent Rob Gifford traveled along China’s Route 312, from the dynamic metropolis of Shanghai to the remote border region with Kazakhstan. In China Road, Mr.

  • Public Event

    In April 2007, the Council on Foreign Relations published the report of the independent task force it had convened to consider to a range of critical issues in the U.S.-China relationship. This distinguished group of specialists recommended that U.S. strategy toward China be directed toward an “affirmative agenda of integrating China into the global community” and identified steps to move toward that goal.

  • Program

    Since 2004, the National Committee has been selecting twelve graduating U.S. high school seniors who have received national recognition for their accomplishments to participate in the yearly U.S.-China Student Leaders Exchange. For the young American participants, the heart of the program is a two-week study visit to China during the summer between high school and college. Americans participants learn about China's successes and challenges and have unusual opportunities to meet and exchange ideas with their Chinese counterparts as a consequence of homestays throughout most of the program.

  • Public Event

    This public program examined had a “then and now” focus, as it examined how the work of foreign journalists in China has changed in the 35 years since the signing of the Shanghai Communique.

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