• Public Event

    A discussion focusing on how the United States and China have moved from strategic cooperation to strategic competition, and what can be done to help ease bilateral tensions.

  • Public Event

    Four former commanders of the U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM), in conversation with National Committee President Stephen A. Orlins, reflect on their time as leaders of the largest military command in the world.

  • Public Event

    Dr. Sheena Greitens discusses China's internal security spending and what it says about contemporary China. 

  • Public Event

    Professor Jerome A. Cohen discusses the political, legal, and economic ramifications of the present situation in the South China Sea, and analyzes the drivers of geopolitical competition in the region.

  • Public Event

    Since 2007, the National Committee has run a series of multi-day briefings for mid-career officers in the United States armed services who have been fast-tracked for top leadership positions. The purpose of these seminars is to provide the participants with a general background on China and to brief them on issues not conventionally covered in their military training – such as China’s domestic politics, economic development, business and trade, foreign policy, rule of law, growth of civil society, environmental concerns and climate change, energy, and the use of soft power.

  • Public Event

    Dr. David M. Finkelstein, vice president of CNA, presents an overview of U.S.-China military relations – its current state, projected future, and essential developments.

  • Public Event

    In early March, China’s central government proposed a defense budget for 2011 that increases military spending nearly 13 percent over 2010. As China expands and modernizes its armed forces, it holds an increasingly influential position in Asian-Pacific security. China has been a crucial player in the Six Party Talks on North Korea’s nuclear proliferation during the last decade.

  • Public Event

    Dr. David M. Lampton shares his perspective on how China’s strengths are changing, where vulnerabilities and uncertainties lie, and how the rest of the world, not least the United States, should view these trends.

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