• Public Event

    In The China Fallacy: How the U.S. Can Benefit from China’s Rise and Avoid Another Cold War, Donald Gross challenges attempts to contain China and warns against protectionism. Instead, he calls for achieving a stable peace with China and negotiating free trade agreements that will bring greater American prosperity consistent with principles for good Sino-American relations advanced by presidents from Nixon onward. Mr.

  • Public Event

    The trial of Bo Xilai, former Party Secretary of Chongqing, has been called the most important political trial in China in decades. On Wednesday, August 28 the National Committee convened a discussion with two American experts on Chinese legal development and politics, Ira Belkin and Cheng Li, respectively.

  • Public Event

    At the conclusion of the fifth round of the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue (S&ED) in Washington, D.C., the National Committee on US-China Relations co-hosted a reception and dinner with the U.S.-China Business Council, honoring Chinese participants Vice Premier Wang Yang and State Councilor Yang Jiechi, and U.S. participants Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker and Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack.

  • Public Event

    Not since Nixon met Mao in ’72 have the top leaders from the United States and China engaged in such extended informal discussions as they did last week at Sunnylands. On Thursday, June 13, at 5 p.m. EDT, the National Committee offered a discussion with two of the United States’ most thoughtful and best informed China watchers, Ambassadors J. Stapleton Roy and Jeffrey Bader.

  • Public Event

    Lee Kuan Yew, the first Prime Minister of the Republic of Singapore, is known around the world as an innovative leader and respected scholar of global strategy. Lee has been a mentor to every Chinese leader from Deng Xiaoping to Xi Jinping, and a counselor to every U.S. president from Richard Nixon to Barack Obama.

  • Public Event

    At a National Committee program on Monday, March 18 Richard Bush, a senior fellow at Brookings, discussed his new book at Dorsey & Whitney in New York City.

  • Public Event

    Since 2007, the National Committee has run a series of multi-day briefings for mid-career officers in the United States armed services who have been fast-tracked for top leadership positions. The purpose of these seminars is to provide the participants with a general background on China and to brief them on issues not conventionally covered in their military training – such as China’s domestic politics, economic development, business and trade, foreign policy, rule of law, growth of civil society, environmental concerns and climate change, energy, and the use of soft power.

  • Public Event

    What underlies China’s policies toward the countries of the Middle East? Dr. Pan Guang, vice chairman and professor of political science and history at the Shanghai Center for International Studies of the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences (SASS), discussed his views with moderator Jan Berris, National Committee Vice President, and the audience on January 24, 2013 at Jones Day New York.

  • Public Event

    With the new make-up of China’s highest political bodies no longer a mystery, the question now turns to how these fifth generation leaders will impact the regional and global world orders over their tenures. Will the Xi-Li government institute the political and financial reforms many call for? Will Sino-U.S. relations enter a new phase of either cooperation or conflict?

  • Public Event

    Despite its impressive size and population, economic vitality, and drive to upgrade its military capabilities, China remains a vulnerable nation surrounded by powerful rivals and potential foes. In China's Search for Security, authors Andrew J. Nathan and Andrew Scobell argue that the key to understanding China’s foreign policy is to grasp these geostrategic challenges, which persist even as the country comes to dominate its neighbors.

  • Program

    This dialogue convenes American and Chinese legal experts to explore the issues surrounding China’s recent maritime disputes and escalated tensions in the Pacific, better understand the impact on regional and U.S.-China relations, and provide suggestions for improving the management and settlement of current disputes.

  • Public Event

    Sidney Rittenberg may not have the nine lives of a cat, but he has lived at least three: first, he spent his childhood in Charleston, S.C., going on to college in North Carolina; he then moved to China at the end of World War II, observing and participating in the Chinese revolution, remaining there for the next 35 years; he returned to the United States in 1980 to become a highly regarded consultant, advising major corporate clients on doing business in China.

  • Public Event

    The National Committee hosted a public program with Fred P. Hochberg, chairman and president of the Export-Import Bank of the United States, on U.S.-China trade tensions and opportunities. The program was held at the offices of Covington and Burling in New York City on October 4, 2012.

  • Public Event

    The National Committee hosted Congressman Rick Larsen (D-WA), co-chair of the bipartisan Congressional U.S.-China Working group, at an informal round table discussion at the Committee's offices on July 30, 2012. The conversation, moderated by President Stephen Orlins, touched on topics ranging from the role of China in the 2012 elections, bipartisan cooperation in Congress, U.S.-China economic and trade issues, and Congressional views of China.

  • Public Event

    On July 19, 2012, at the National Committee headquarters in New York City, a roundtable discussion on security issues in China was held featuring Dr. Xia Liping, dean of the School of Political Science & International Relations at Tongji University, and his colleagues Dr. Leng Xinyu (China University of Political Science and Law), and Dr. Dai Ying and Dr. Liu Yiqiang (Tsinghua University).

Filter by tags:

Connect with Us

Support Us

The National Committee on United States-China Relations, Inc., welcomes financial and in-kind contributions. The Committee is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization and, as such, donations to it are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.