• Public Event

    His Excellency Wen Jiabao, Premier of People’s Republic of China, expressed optimism about the future of U.S.-China bilateral relations at a dinner co-hosted in his honor by the National Committee and the US-China Business Council. Held at the Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York City, the dinner began with remarks by Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke and former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, who both marveled at China’s rapid growth and stressed the importance of the bilateral relationship.

  • Public Event

    Ambassador Nicholas Platt discussed his new book China Boys: How U.S. Relations with the PRC Began and Grew, and the resumption of U.S.-China relations in the 1960s and 1970s at the offices of Jones Day in New York.

  • Public Event

    Ma Zhengang, former Chinese ambassador to the United Kingdom and current president of the China Institute of International Studies (CIIS), visited the National Committee office for a small, off-the-record roundtable discussion. Ambassador Ma was joined by scholars from CIIS and Peking University, and an official from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

  • Public Event

    On April 7, the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations held a roundtable discussion with Professor David Zweig. He examined China’s search for energy and other resources and its impact on Sino-American relations. Professor Zweig proposed that, while China is rising as a world power, it is simplistic to say that this is China’s century: China is rising but doing so within a system that is still dominated by the United States, the “hegemon.” We should not think about China’s rise without considering the role and the responses of the United States.

  • Public Event

    The National Committee welcomed Christine Loh, the founder and CEO of Hong Kong think tank Civil Exchange, on February 8, 2010 for a roundtable discussion. In her opening remarks, Ms. Loh addressed five areas: the economy, civil society, Hong Kong government, Hong Kong-China relations, and perceptions of Hong Kong today. She then took questions on a wide array of issues.

  • Public Event

    Professor Deborah Bräutigam discussed her new book, The Dragon’s Gift: The Real Story of China in Africa, at the offices of Jones Day in New York. The book examines Chinese aid and state-sponsored economic engagement in Africa. China’s aid in Africa is based on mutual benefit – and goes far beyond a popular western misconception of a simple effort to extract oil and other strategic natural resources, regardless of other considerations.

  • Public Event

    The National Committee welcomed Dr. Lai Shin-yuan, minister of Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council, for a roundtable discussion on July 13. Dr. Lai previously served as a National Security Council advisor in Chen Shui-bian’s administration and a legislator representing the Taiwan Solidarity Union party from 2005 to 2008. President Ma Ying-jeou crossed party lines to ask Dr.

  • Public Event

    On March 8, sixty miles off of Hainan Island, an American surveillance ship, the USNS Impeccable, and five Chinese ships were involved in what Director of National Intelligence Dennis C. Blair called the "most serious" military dispute between United States and China since the April, 2001 EP-3 incident.

  • Public Event

    In mid-January a two-day seminar was held in Beijing that brought together many of those who were involved in the 1979 normalization of relations between China and the United States. The Chinese People’s Institute of Foreign Affairs (CPIFA) and the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States were the sponsors, the National Committee was a co-sponsor and the U.S. Embassy in Beijing and the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs provided support.

  • Program

    In July, 2008, the National Committee brought together 30 of the best minds on various aspects of China and several specialists in other areas for a synergistic, cross-cutting look at some of the major challenges facing China and the United States and what the best policies might be to enhance cooperation and ameliorate conflict over them.

  • Public Event

    The ambassadors candidly reflect on the challenges, excitement, crises and achievements of their tenures, and share insights on the future of U.S.-China relations.

  • Public Event

    The National Committee will host a roundtable discussion with Professor Cui Liru, president of the China Institutes of Contemporary International Research (CICIR), and his colleagues, on Monday afternoon, November 10. Professor Cui and his colleagues are interested in the foreign policy of the new U.S. administration, particularly regarding China, the Middle East, South Korea, and the DPRK.

  • Public Event

    The National Committee and the American Jewish Committee hosted a talk by Professor Pan Guang on Sino-Middle Eastern relations, focusing on Chinese policies toward Israel and Iran on Tuesday, November 11, 2008.

  • Public Event

    The National Committee hosted a breakfast meeting with Sun Chao on Friday, November 7, 2008. Mr. Sun has been first party secretary of the Minhang District for a year. Prior to that he was Xuhui District mayor, a position he held since 2004. He was born and raised in the Xuhui District, the former French Concession with exceptional architecture and a rich cultural history. Sun is a graduate of East China University of Politics and Law with a major in Constitution and Legislature.

  • Public Event

    On June 18, 2008, the National Committee co-hosted a dinner in Washington, DC, in honor of Wang Qishan, Vice Premier of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China. Informally concluding the 4th round of the U.S.-China Strategic Economic Dialogue (SED), the dinner provided the occasion for Vice Premier Wang and U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Paulson to give public addresses concerning SED’s progress.

Filter by tags:

Connect with Us

Support Us

The National Committee on United States-China Relations, Inc., welcomes financial and in-kind contributions. The Committee is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization and, as such, donations to it are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.