• Public Event

    With the rise of tensions in Northeast Asia over the past few months, understanding the complex interactions among China, Japan and the two Koreas has become more important than ever, as has understanding the effect such tensions have on the United States and its interaction with these countries. The National Committee, in cooperation with the Japan Society, brought together three experts to provide insights into the current state of the regional security relationships: the Brookings Institution’s Richard Bush, the Eurasia Group’s Ian Bremmer, and Johns Hopkins University’s Kent Calder.

  • Public Event

    National Committee Director Edward Steinfeld discussed his new book, Playing Our Game: Why China's Rise Doesn't Threaten the West (Oxford University Press, 2010), at a Jones Day program on November 2. In the book, Steinfeld explores the monumental economic and political ramifications of China’s integration into global production.

  • Public Event

    His Excellency Wen Jiabao, Premier of People’s Republic of China, expressed optimism about the future of U.S.-China bilateral relations at a dinner co-hosted in his honor by the National Committee and the US-China Business Council. Held at the Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York City, the dinner began with remarks by Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke and former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, who both marveled at China’s rapid growth and stressed the importance of the bilateral relationship.

  • Program

    The National Committee, in partnership with the Institute for Sustainable Communities and with funding from the State Department's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, sponsored an exchange of emerging leaders from earthquake-affected areas of Sichuan and post-Katrina areas of the Gulf Coast designed to exchange ideas about sustainability in long-term post-disaster recovery.

  • Public Event

    Ambassador Nicholas Platt discussed his new book China Boys: How U.S. Relations with the PRC Began and Grew, and the resumption of U.S.-China relations in the 1960s and 1970s at the offices of Jones Day in New York.

  • Public Event

    Ma Zhengang, former Chinese ambassador to the United Kingdom and current president of the China Institute of International Studies (CIIS), visited the National Committee office for a small, off-the-record roundtable discussion. Ambassador Ma was joined by scholars from CIIS and Peking University, and an official from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

  • Public Event

    Jeffrey Wasserstrom and Joseph Kahn discussed the challenges of writing about China from the perspectives of an academic and a journalist at Jones Day in New York. Dr. Wasserstrom is a professor of history at the University of California, Irvine, and Mr. Kahn is deputy foreign editor of The New York Times.

  • Public Event

    The National Committee hosted an evening of stories and reflection with Jerome Alan Cohen on Tuesday, April 20 in New York City. National Committee President Stephen A. Orlins interviewed his law school professor, mentor and friend as we celebrated Professor Cohen’s 80th birthday.

  • Public Event

    Former Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for China Affairs Timothy P. Stratford discussed challenges in U.S.-China economic relations in an off-the record program at the Covington and Burling office in New York on April 1, 2010. He highlighted some of the core trade issues in the U.S.-China relationship, discussed the available tools and approaches for addressing these issues, and described the complex context in which these tools may be used.

  • Public Event

    The National Committee held a roundtable discussion with Ira Belkin on February 10, 2010 in New York. Belkin shared his insights on trends in human rights and the rule of law in China. He also discussed the Ford Foundation’s work in these areas. The proceedings of the roundtable were off-the-record.

  • Public Event

    The National Committee welcomed Christine Loh, the founder and CEO of Hong Kong think tank Civil Exchange, on February 8, 2010 for a roundtable discussion. In her opening remarks, Ms. Loh addressed five areas: the economy, civil society, Hong Kong government, Hong Kong-China relations, and perceptions of Hong Kong today. She then took questions on a wide array of issues.

  • Program

    In December 2018, experts from the American and Chinese governments, the legal field, and academia convened in Beijing to discuss important and timely issues, ranging from safeguarding human rights, including China’s governance in Xinjiang and U.S. immigration law, to government supervision and accountability, and legal protections for specific groups. The Americans also visited the Supreme People's Court, where they met with President Zhou Qiang, and observed a "virtual" civil trial at the Beijing Internet Court.

  • Public Event

    Peter Hessler, described by the Wall Street Journal as “one of the Western world’s most thoughtful writers on modern China,” discussed his new book, Country Driving: A Journey Through China From Farm to Factory, on the morning of its hardcover release on February 9th, 2010. Interviewed by National Committee President Steve Orlins, Mr.

  • Public Event

    Professor Deborah Bräutigam discussed her new book, The Dragon’s Gift: The Real Story of China in Africa, at the offices of Jones Day in New York. The book examines Chinese aid and state-sponsored economic engagement in Africa. China’s aid in Africa is based on mutual benefit – and goes far beyond a popular western misconception of a simple effort to extract oil and other strategic natural resources, regardless of other considerations.

  • Public Event

    Who are China’s leaders? How do they think? What are the implications for China’s future? Robert Lawrence Kuhn discussed his latest book How China’s Leaders Think: The Inside Story of China’s Reform and What This Means for the Future (John Wiley & Sons, 2009) on January 12. Kuhn draws on exclusive interviews with over 100 Chinese leaders, providing an insider’s view on what China’s current and future leaders think about trade, business, finance, media, diplomacy and more.

Filter by tags:

Connect with Us

Support Us

The National Committee on United States-China Relations, Inc., welcomes financial and in-kind contributions. The Committee is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization and, as such, donations to it are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.