• Public Event

    China’s judiciary is a key component in furthering development of the rule of law throughout the country. In recent years, the educational and professional standards of judges and the quality of judicial opinions have been raised, yet much work remains to be done in order to improve the administration of the courts, ensure enforcement of laws and judgments, and remove corrupt influences from the courts.

  • Public Event

    The National Committee and the Asia Society cosponsored the premiere of Young & Restless in China, a documentary film that follows the lives of nine young Chinese over the course of four years.

  • Program

    With limited funds at their disposal, China's NGOs are increasing their human resource pool and engaging their communities by utilizing volunteers to fulfill their missions. It is within this context that the Strengthening Volunteer Management in Chinese NGOs project was developed in 2005, with the goal of providing Chinese NGO professionals practical training in volunteer management.

  • Program

    Despite differences in political traditions and practices, municipal government officials in the United States, mainland China, and Taiwan share interests in delivering services to citizens, promoting economic development, and managing government resources. Many have taken advantage of the Internet's capacity for fast, inexpensive communication and introduced innovative municipal websites.

  • Public Event

    China has made great strides in introducing a modern body of law and legal institutions over the course of the past 30 years. In the process, it also has raised the legal awareness and expectations of its citizens. Yet the country still faces major hurdles in enforcing laws, ensuring an independent judiciary and facilitating the access of ordinary citizens to the legal system.

  • Program

    The National Committee sends three bipartisian delegations of congressional senior staff members to China each year for a study tour to learn first-hand about issues impacting China and the U.S.-China relationship. Delegation members travel to Beijing and other regions of China to meet with counterparts working for China's central, provincial, and municipal governments, as well as with NGO leaders, academics, business leaders, and members of the media.

  • Program

    The National Committee regularly sends members of Congress to China, having arranged and escorted eight delegations since 2006. The week-long study tours are designed to educate the congressmen and women about China through personal introductions to senior Chinese leaders and a range of informative site visits and meetings.

  • Public Event

    Professor Lucian Pye and Professor Robert A. Scalapino, two distinguished scholars in the field of U.S.-China relations who have served as National Committee chairmen, discussed the founding of the National Committee, its work over the past 40 years and the role it might play in the future at a May 3 anniversary program in New York City. National Committee chair Carla Hills welcomed the many current and former directors, members and guests who attended the program.

  • Public Event

    On April 20, 2006, the National Committee co-hosted a dinner in Washington, DC in honor of Hu Jintao, president of the People’s Republic of China. This provided the occasion for President Hu’s only public address in Washington, DC. In his remarks, President Hu noted that U.S.-China relations have grown beyond the bilateral context and have become increasingly global in importance.

  • Program

    As part of an overall strategic review, the Rockefeller Foundation asked the National Committee to help it look at how China’s emergence affects the foundation’s strategies and goals. The China Project is an ongoing series of seminars and discussions begun in 2005 with the aim of providing the Foundation staff an opportunity to examine the global and regional impacts of China’s rise and its implications for Foundation programming around the world. The focus is on issues the Foundation staff identified as important to their programmatic goals.

  • Program

    In February 2005, the National Committee brought seven Chinese legal aid professionals to the United States to spend five weeks examining the governance and administration of American professional legal service organizations.

  • Program

    Under the National Committee's auspices, a delegation of 17 young American political leaders — some serving in elected positions at the state or local level, others leaders of political organizations — visited the People's Republic of China in May 1977. Assembled with the cooperation of the American Council of Young Political Leaders, it was the first such visit of its kind.

  • Program

    Between 2000 and 2005, the National Committee held an essay contest in honor of the late scholar A. Doak Barnett. American and Chinese graduate students submitted 1,500-word essays on topics in U.S.-China relations, with authors of the best essays receiving rewards of $1,000.

  • Program

    George H.W. Bush and Deng Xiaoping met for the first time in October 1975, when an 18-member delegation of American leaders active in public education on world affairs visited China to discuss international issues.

  • Program

    Started in September 1984 as an off-the-record gathering of leading citizens of China and America, the U.S.-China Dialogue was the first formal instance of Track II diplomacy in the Sino-American relationship. It was held every 12-18 months, alternately in China and the United States, until 2002. 

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