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    Diana Fu is an assistant professor of political science at The University of Toronto and an affiliate of the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Asian Institute. Her research focuses on popular contention, state power, and civil society in contemporary China. Her book, Mobilizing Without the Masses, Control and Contention in China (Cambridge University Press, 2018), examines how weak civil society mobilizes under authoritarian rule. It won the 2018 American Political Science Association’s Gregory Luebbert Prize for the best book in comparative politics published in the previous two years. It also won the 2019 best book award from the International Studies Association’s Political Sociology section.

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    Peilei Fan is an associate professor of urban and regional planning at the School of Planning, Design, and Construction, Michigan State University (MSU). She also holds a joint research appointment at the Center for Global Change and Earth Observations and is an adjunct faculty member of the Department of Geography, Environment, and Spatial Science at MSU. She has a Ph.D. in economic development and an M.S. in electrical engineering and computer science, both from MIT.

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    Iza Ding is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Pittsburgh, with a secondary appointment in public policy at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. As a scholar of political development and legacies across the communist and post-communist world, she uses diverse methodological tools to explore pressing public policy issues. She has active projects in the realms of environmental policy, legal development, bureaucratic organizations, and public opinion. Dr. Ding received her Ph.D. in government from Harvard University, and her B.A. from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, earning a dual degree in political science and Russian and Eastern European studies. She has in-depth knowledge and field experience in China, Poland, Vietnam, and North Korea.

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    Lenora Chu is a journalist and author of the award-winning Little Soldiers, a narrative account of China’s education system. She is also Shanghai bureau chief of the nonprofit Christian Science Monitor. With 15 years’ experience in the United States and China, Lenora’s work illuminates the intersection of culture, education, and global competitiveness — a passion borne in part of growing up with Chinese parents in America.

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    Keisha A. Brown is an assistant professor of history at Tennessee State University in the Department of History, Political Science, Geography, and Africana Studies. She graduated with her bachelor’s degree from the University of Notre Dame, earned her doctorate from the University of Southern California, and was a 2018–2019 postdoctoral fellow at the James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference at Emory University. Dr. Brown is an Asian studies scholar with a regional focus on East Asia specializing in modern Chinese history. Her research and teaching interests include comparative East Asian histories, postcolonial theory, transnational studies, world history, and race and ethnic studies. Dr. Brown’s research examines networks of difference in China used to understand the Black foreign other through an investigation of the social and political context that African Americans navigated and negotiated during their time in Maoist China.

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    Jude Blanchette is a senior advisor and the China Practice lead at Crumpton Group, a geo-political risk and business advisory based in Arlington, VA, where he advises private sector clients on China’s political and regulatory environment. He is also an adjunct fellow of the Asia-Pacific Security Program at the Center for a New American Security.

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    The National Committee on United States-China Relations is pleased to have selected the sixth cohort of its Public Intellectuals Program (PIP), generously funded by Carnegie Corporation of New York. The twenty fellows comprise a wide range of research interests, geographic locations, and types of institutions.

  • Podcast / U.S.-China Insights

    The Paris Climate Agreement marked a breakthrough in international cooperation on climate change, with 196 states and the European Union negotiating a pact in December 2015 to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. The United States and China, the top two emitters of greenhouse gases on the planet, announced their intentions to join the agreement in April 2016. Since then, President Donald Trump has vowed to withdraw from the agreement, while China has reaffirmed its commitment to meeting the targets outlined within. Dr. Kelly Sims Gallagher of The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, and a senior policy advisor on science and technology to the Obama administration during the talks, provides insight into the negotiation process. She describes the steps taken to reach the agreement, and the alternating progress and stagnation in Chinese and American climate policies in the years since.

  • e-News
  • News

    In an interview on CNN's Quest Means Business, Stephen Orlins, president of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, reflects on whether trade talks between the two countries could be extended and explains why tensions with Huawei embody a "downward spiral." Recorded 2/19/19.

  • News

    The National Committee on U.S.-China Relations is pleased to announce the appointment of three new members to its Board of Directors on December 18, 2018. We are honored to welcome Directors Jonathan Auerbach, Anja Manuel, and Susan A. Thornton, who will help guide the National Committee at this critical period in the relationship.

  • News

    The Council on Foreign Relations' inaugural C.V. Starr & Co. Annual Lecture on China featured NCUSCR President Stephen Orlins and Director Elizabeth Economy, as well as Ely Ratner and Nicholas Kristof for a panel discussion on the future of U.S.-China relations amidst ongoing trade frictions, tensions in the South China Sea, and political, demographic, and economic developments within China itself.

  • Basic page

    Yong Lu joined the National Committee in 2019 as senior director of development. She leads the fundraising effort and builds strategic partnerships for the organization to ensure all programs are fully funded and yield valuable, long-term outcomes.

  • Supporting Material / Past Fellows / Professional Fellows Program

    Spring 2019 (Outbound) Participant bios Fellows and their home/host organizations

  • Supporting Material / Past Fellows / Professional Fellows Program

    Spring 2018 (Outbound) Participant bios Fellows and their home/host organizations Fall 2017 (Inbound) Participant bios

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