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    Tabitha Grace Mallory is founder and CEO of the China Ocean Institute and an affiliate professor of the University of Washington Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. Dr. Mallory specializes in Chinese foreign and environmental policy. She is currently conducting research on China and global ocean governance and has published work on China’s fisheries and oceans policy.

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    Yingyi Ma is an associate professor of sociology and the director of Asian/Asian American studies at Syracuse University. She is also a senior research associate at the Center for Policy Research in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. Dr.

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    Ya-Wen Lei is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at Harvard University, and is affiliated with the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard. She grew up in Taipei, Taiwan. Dr. Lei holds a J.S.D.

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    Isaac B. Kardon, Ph.D., is an assistant professor at the U.S Naval War College (NWC) in the Department of Strategic and Operational Research. He is a core member of the China Maritime Studies Institute (CMSI), where he researches and writes on maritime disputes, Indo-Pacific maritime security and commerce, China-Pakistan relations, and the law of the sea.

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    Kelly Hammond is an assistant professor in the Department of History at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. Dr. Hammond received her Ph.D. in East Asian history from Georgetown University in July 2015. Her work specializes in the history of Islam in East Asia, particularly focusing on the political, social, and cultural history of Chinese Muslims from the Qing Dynasty through into the People’s Republic of China.

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    Arunabh Ghosh is a historian of twentieth century China with interests in social, economic, and environmental history, (transnational) histories of science and statecraft, and China-India history. He is currently an assistant professor in the History Department at Harvard University.

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    Diana Fu is an associate professor of political science at The University of Toronto and an affiliate of the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Asian Institute. Dr. Fu's research examines popular contention, state power, civil society, and citizenship, with a focus on contemporary China. Her book Mobilizing Without the Masses: Control and Contention in China (2018, Cambridge Studies in Contentious Politics Series) theorizes a counter-intuitive form of mobilization under authoritarian rule. It won the 2018 American Political Science Association’s Luebbert Prize for the best book in comparative politics, the 2019 International Studies Association’s best book award in international political sociology, and the 2019 Charles Tilly Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Book Award from the American Sociological Association.

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    Peilei Fan is an associate professor of urban and regional planning at the School of Planning, Design, and Construction, Michigan State University (MSU). She also holds a joint research appointment at the Center for Global Change and Earth Observations and is an adjunct faculty member of the Department of Geography, Environment, and Spatial Science at MSU. She has a Ph.D. in economic development and an M.S. in electrical engineering and computer science, both from MIT.

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    Iza Ding is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Pittsburgh, with a secondary appointment in public policy at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. As a scholar of political development and legacies across the communist and post-communist world, she uses diverse methodological tools to explore pressing public policy issues. She has active projects in the realms of environmental policy, legal development, bureaucratic organizations, and public opinion. Dr. Ding received her Ph.D. in government from Harvard University, and her B.A. from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, earning a dual degree in political science and Russian and Eastern European studies. She has in-depth knowledge and field experience in China, Poland, Vietnam, and North Korea.

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    Lenora Chu is a journalist and author of the award-winning Little Soldiers, a narrative account of China’s education system. She is also Shanghai bureau chief of the nonprofit Christian Science Monitor. With 15 years’ experience in the United States and China, Lenora’s work illuminates the intersection of culture, education, and global competitiveness — a passion borne in part of growing up with Chinese parents in America.

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    Keisha A. Brown is an assistant professor of history at Tennessee State University in the Department of History, Political Science, Geography, and Africana Studies. She graduated with her bachelor’s degree from the University of Notre Dame, earned her doctorate from the University of Southern California, and was a 2018–2019 postdoctoral fellow at the James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference at Emory University. Dr. Brown is an Asian studies scholar with a regional focus on East Asia specializing in modern Chinese history. Her research and teaching interests include comparative East Asian histories, postcolonial theory, transnational studies, world history, and race and ethnic studies. Dr. Brown’s research examines networks of difference in China used to understand the Black foreign other through an investigation of the social and political context that African Americans navigated and negotiated during their time in Maoist China.

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    Jude Blanchette holds the Freeman Chair in China Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). Previously, he was engagement director at The Conference Board’s China Center for Economics and Business in Beijing, where he researched China’s political environment with a focus on the workings of the Communist Party of China and its impact on foreign companies and investors. Prior to working at The Conference Board, Mr. Blanchette was the assistant director of the 21st Century China Center at the University of California, San Diego.

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    The National Committee on United States-China Relations is pleased to have selected the sixth cohort of its Public Intellectuals Program (PIP), generously funded by Carnegie Corporation of New York. The twenty fellows comprise a wide range of research interests, geographic locations, and types of institutions.

  • Podcast / U.S.-China Insights

    The Paris Climate Agreement marked a breakthrough in international cooperation on climate change, with 196 states and the European Union negotiating a pact in December 2015 to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. The United States and China, the top two emitters of greenhouse gases on the planet, announced their intentions to join the agreement in April 2016. Since then, President Donald Trump has vowed to withdraw from the agreement, while China has reaffirmed its commitment to meeting the targets outlined within. Dr. Kelly Sims Gallagher of The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, and a senior policy advisor on science and technology to the Obama administration during the talks, provides insight into the negotiation process. She describes the steps taken to reach the agreement, and the alternating progress and stagnation in Chinese and American climate policies in the years since.

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