• Public Event

    On June 18, 2008, the National Committee co-hosted a dinner in Washington, DC, in honor of Wang Qishan, Vice Premier of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China. Informally concluding the 4th round of the U.S.-China Strategic Economic Dialogue (SED), the dinner provided the occasion for Vice Premier Wang and U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Paulson to give public addresses concerning SED’s progress.

  • Program

    Six editors of American foreign policy and political affairs journals traveled to Beijing, Shanghai, and Taipei to gain a greater understanding of Chinese foreign policy issues.

  • Program

    The Master Teacher China Seminar is a half-day of China programming for some of the top educators in the country.

  • Public Event

    Professor A. Tom Grunfeld led a conference call discussion for National Committee members on April 16, which included a concise historical overview, a summary of the present situation in Tibet and consideration of the implications of recent events for U.S.-China relations and the Beijing Olympics.

  • Public Event

    The evolving security environment in Northeast Asia continues to be a major focus for U.S. Pacific Command. Although events and trends have challenged regional stability, Northeast Asia remains stable and secure, enabling prosperity and growth. Admiral Timothy J. Keating, Commander, U.S. Pacific Command, will discuss transformed U.S. alliances with Japan and the Republic of Korea; appropriate U.S.

  • Program

    China's rapid development and Sino-American relations have a direct impact on the lives of nearly everyone in the United States. CHINA Town Hall is a national conversation about China that provides Americans across the United States and beyond the opportunity to discuss issues in the relationship with leading experts.

  • Public Event

    Business has been a driving force in expanding U.S.-China relations, and American companies of all sizes continue to enter the China market or expand their current operations at an unprecedented rate. What do American businesses operating in China see as key issues, and what steps can both countries’ governments take to improve the business climate?

  • Public Event

    Dr. David M. Lampton shares his perspective on how China’s strengths are changing, where vulnerabilities and uncertainties lie, and how the rest of the world, not least the United States, should view these trends.

  • Public Event

    The National Committee convened a conference call program for its members on the morning of March 24, to discuss the outcome of the March 22 Taiwan presidential election. While the election of KMT candidate Ma Ying-jeou was not a surprise, his large margin of victory was. The KMT, with its control of the Executive Yuan and Legislative Yuan, as well as many local governments, is now in a strong position to implement its agenda.

  • Public Event

    David Denoon, an economist and political scientist on the faculty of New York University, gave National Committee members and guests an overview of the key findings of his recently published study, The Economic and Strategic Rise of China and India: Asian Realignments After the 1997 Financial Crisis. This public program was held on the evening of January 8 in New York.

  • Public Event

    Concern about the safety of products imported from China has added a new source of tension to U.S.-China trade relations. In this off-the-record conference call with National Committee members, three specialists offered their analysis of how the current issue has developed over the course of the last several months, examined dynamics within China that contributed to weaknesses in quality control and considered the potential for a legislative response on Capitol Hill.

  • Public Event

    In April 2007, the Council on Foreign Relations published the report of the independent task force it had convened to consider to a range of critical issues in the U.S.-China relationship. This distinguished group of specialists recommended that U.S. strategy toward China be directed toward an “affirmative agenda of integrating China into the global community” and identified steps to move toward that goal.

  • Program

    The National Committee sends three bipartisian delegations of congressional senior staff members to China each year for a study tour to learn first-hand about issues impacting China and the U.S.-China relationship. Delegation members travel to Beijing and other regions of China to meet with counterparts working for China's central, provincial, and municipal governments, as well as with NGO leaders, academics, business leaders, and members of the media.

  • Program

    The National Committee regularly sends members of Congress to China, having arranged and escorted eight delegations since 2006. The week-long study tours are designed to educate the congressmen and women about China through personal introductions to senior Chinese leaders and a range of informative site visits and meetings.

  • Public Event

    In his book, Rising Star: China’s New Security Diplomacy, Bates Gill, Freeman Chair in China Studies, Center for Strategic and International Studies, traces the shift in China’s security diplomacy to several factors, among them its concern with American primacy in the post-Cold War world, its vision for its own peaceful rise and the emergence of “new thinkers” in China who have provided the theoretical underpinnings for a more pragmatic approach.

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