• Public Event

    A discussion of the implications of China’s Africa policy for the United States.

  • Public Event

    The U.S. Department of Justice’s China Initiative is intended to counter national security threats posed by China, but it defines the threats too broadly, which raises problematic implications both for the U.S. criminal justice system and for collaboration with people who have ties to China.

  • Public Event

    A March 2020 survey of American views of China conducted by the Pew Research Center shows an increase in negative perceptions of China.

  • Public Event

    Ambassador Robert Zoellick offered reflections on his “responsible stakeholder” speech at the National Committee’s 2005 Gala dinner and the policy implications of his approach for the United States when considering the current Sino-U.S. relationship.

  • Public Event

    In its fight against the coronavirus, should the United States consider China an enemy or a partner? Graham Allison discussed prospects for cooperation in the fight against the coronavirus.

  • Public Event

    A discussion focusing on how the United States and China have moved from strategic cooperation to strategic competition, and what can be done to help ease bilateral tensions.

  • Public Event

    To commemorate the 40th anniversary of the announcement of the establishment of diplomatic relations between the United States and the People’s Republic of China, the National Committee convenes a panel of experts who have been instrumental to building the relationship.

  • Public Event

    Former U.S. Ambassadors to China Winston Lord and Stapleton Roy discuss the significance of the Shanghai Communiqué. 

  • Public Event

    Jerome Cohen and Ezra Vogel reflect on normalization and how academic study of China has changed over the course of their careers.

  • Public Event

    Since 2007, the National Committee has run a series of multi-day briefings for mid-career officers in the United States armed services who have been fast-tracked for top leadership positions. The purpose of these seminars is to provide the participants with a general background on China and to brief them on issues not conventionally covered in their military training – such as China’s domestic politics, economic development, business and trade, foreign policy, rule of law, growth of civil society, environmental concerns and climate change, energy, and the use of soft power.

  • Public Event

    In mid-January a two-day seminar was held in Beijing that brought together many of those who were involved in the 1979 normalization of relations between China and the United States. The Chinese People’s Institute of Foreign Affairs (CPIFA) and the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States were the sponsors, the National Committee was a co-sponsor and the U.S. Embassy in Beijing and the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs provided support.

  • Program

    China's rapid development and Sino-American relations have a direct impact on the lives of nearly everyone in the United States. CHINA Town Hall is a national conversation about China that provides Americans across the United States and beyond the opportunity to discuss issues in the relationship with leading experts.

  • Program

    The National Committee sends three bipartisian delegations of congressional senior staff members to China each year for a study tour to learn first-hand about issues impacting China and the U.S.-China relationship. Delegation members travel to Beijing and other regions of China to meet with counterparts working for China's central, provincial, and municipal governments, as well as with NGO leaders, academics, business leaders, and members of the media.

  • Program

    The National Committee regularly sends members of Congress to China, having arranged and escorted eight delegations since 2006. The week-long study tours are designed to educate the congressmen and women about China through personal introductions to senior Chinese leaders and a range of informative site visits and meetings.

  • Public Event

    On April 20, 2006, the National Committee co-hosted a dinner in Washington, DC in honor of Hu Jintao, president of the People’s Republic of China. This provided the occasion for President Hu’s only public address in Washington, DC. In his remarks, President Hu noted that U.S.-China relations have grown beyond the bilateral context and have become increasingly global in importance.

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