• Program

    Between 2000 and 2005, the National Committee held an essay contest in honor of the late scholar A. Doak Barnett. American and Chinese graduate students submitted 1,500-word essays on topics in U.S.-China relations, with authors of the best essays receiving rewards of $1,000.

  • Program

    George H.W. Bush and Deng Xiaoping met for the first time in October 1975, when an 18-member delegation of American leaders active in public education on world affairs visited China to discuss international issues.

  • Program

    Started in September 1984 as an off-the-record gathering of leading citizens of China and America, the U.S.-China Dialogue was the first formal instance of Track II diplomacy in the Sino-American relationship. It was held every 12-18 months, alternately in China and the United States, until 2002. 

  • Program

    Launched when only a trickle of Chinese graduate students and scholars came to the United States for study, the Scholar Orientation Program was created to supplement academic training that Chinese scholars received at U.S. institutions by providing them with greater exposure to America's history, culture, and key institutions.

  • Program

    In June 2007, the National Committee worked with long-time partner, the National League of Cities (NLC), and new partner, the League of California Cities (LCC) on a ten-day study tour to Beijing, Qingdao and Shanghai for mayors, city council members, and the NLC and LCC leadership.

  • Public Event

    Now in its twelfth year, this annual lecture—the first and only ongoing lecture series on U.S.-China relations that takes place on the Mainland—affords its guests the opportunity for a frank and forthright discussion of current and potential issues between the two countries.

  • Program

    During the opening months of the 113th session of Congress, the National Committee again organized a briefing for freshman Members of Congress on critical issues in the U.S.-China relationship. Headlined by Governor Jon Huntsman, former Ambassador to China (and a former National Committee Director), this session was the fourth of its kind in as many election cycles. Governor Huntsman drew on his vast experience with China to comment on the present-day bilateral relationship in an off-the-record session on Capitol Hill.

  • Program

    While a few staff members had joined their bosses on early trips to China made by the Senate and House leadership, it was the National Committee, in the summer of 1976, that sent the first group composed solely of staff members to China. This presaged the MEACA (Mutual Education and Cultural Act) program the Committee currently runs for both D.C and state/district-based staff members.

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