• Public Event

    Jeffrey Wasserstrom and Maura Cunningham outline how to understand China in the 21st century.

  • Public Event

    This program is part of the 2017 CHINA Town Hall, one of over 80 programs hosted by local partners across the United States.

  • Public Event

    Four former commanders of the U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM), in conversation with National Committee President Stephen A. Orlins, reflect on their time as leaders of the largest military command in the world.

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    Former Secretaries of State Madeleine Albright and Henry Kissinger reflect on the evolution of Sino-American relations and offer their views on the future of the relationship.

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    Professor Jerome A. Cohen discusses the political, legal, and economic ramifications of the present situation in the South China Sea, and analyzes the drivers of geopolitical competition in the region.

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    Every morning, the national security advisor briefs the president of the United States on the world’s most pressing security threats, from ISIS to the Zika virus. Our collective security is increasingly reliant upon cooperation between the United States and China, whether it is minimizing the risk of conflict in the South China Sea, dealing with North Korea’s nuclear weapons program, or responding to climate change. We explore these issues and more in a program featuring former National Security Advisors Richard V. Allen, Stephen J. Hadley, and Robert McFarlane in conversation with National Committee President Stephen A. Orlins.

  • Public Event

    Defense Secretaries Harold Brown, William Cohen, Chuck Hagel, and  William J. Perry, in conversation with National Committee President Stephen A. Orlins, reflect on their experiences at DoD and the future of the U.S.-China security relationship.

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    Since the end of the Cold War, China and Japan have faced each other as powers of relatively equal strength for the first time in their long history. As the two great powers of East Asia, the way they both compete and cooperate with each other, and the way they conduct their relations in the new era, will play a big part in the evolution of the region as a whole.

  • Public Event

    Not since Nixon met Mao in ’72 have the top leaders from the United States and China engaged in such extended informal discussions as they did last week at Sunnylands. On Thursday, June 13, at 5 p.m. EDT, the National Committee offered a discussion with two of the United States’ most thoughtful and best informed China watchers, Ambassadors J. Stapleton Roy and Jeffrey Bader.

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    At a National Committee program on Monday, March 18 Richard Bush, a senior fellow at Brookings, discussed his new book at Dorsey & Whitney in New York City.

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    What underlies China’s policies toward the countries of the Middle East? Dr. Pan Guang, vice chairman and professor of political science and history at the Shanghai Center for International Studies of the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences (SASS), discussed his views with moderator Jan Berris, National Committee Vice President, and the audience on January 24, 2013 at Jones Day New York.

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    With the new make-up of China’s highest political bodies no longer a mystery, the question now turns to how these fifth generation leaders will impact the regional and global world orders over their tenures. Will the Xi-Li government institute the political and financial reforms many call for? Will Sino-U.S. relations enter a new phase of either cooperation or conflict?

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    Despite its impressive size and population, economic vitality, and drive to upgrade its military capabilities, China remains a vulnerable nation surrounded by powerful rivals and potential foes. In China's Search for Security, authors Andrew J. Nathan and Andrew Scobell argue that the key to understanding China’s foreign policy is to grasp these geostrategic challenges, which persist even as the country comes to dominate its neighbors.

  • Public Event

    Sidney Rittenberg may not have the nine lives of a cat, but he has lived at least three: first, he spent his childhood in Charleston, S.C., going on to college in North Carolina; he then moved to China at the end of World War II, observing and participating in the Chinese revolution, remaining there for the next 35 years; he returned to the United States in 1980 to become a highly regarded consultant, advising major corporate clients on doing business in China.

  • Public Event

    The National Committee hosted a public program with Fred P. Hochberg, chairman and president of the Export-Import Bank of the United States, on U.S.-China trade tensions and opportunities. The program was held at the offices of Covington and Burling in New York City on October 4, 2012.

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