• Program

    The Master Teacher China Seminar is a half-day of China programming for some of the top educators in the country.

  • Public Event

    Professor A. Tom Grunfeld led a conference call discussion for National Committee members on April 16, which included a concise historical overview, a summary of the present situation in Tibet and consideration of the implications of recent events for U.S.-China relations and the Beijing Olympics.

  • Program

    China's rapid development and Sino-American relations have a direct impact on the lives of nearly everyone in the United States. CHINA Town Hall is a national conversation about China that provides Americans across the United States and beyond the opportunity to discuss issues in the relationship with leading experts.

  • Public Event

    Concern about the safety of products imported from China has added a new source of tension to U.S.-China trade relations. In this off-the-record conference call with National Committee members, three specialists offered their analysis of how the current issue has developed over the course of the last several months, examined dynamics within China that contributed to weaknesses in quality control and considered the potential for a legislative response on Capitol Hill.

  • Program

    The National Committee sends three bipartisian delegations of congressional senior staff members to China each year for a study tour to learn first-hand about issues impacting China and the U.S.-China relationship. Delegation members travel to Beijing and other regions of China to meet with counterparts working for China's central, provincial, and municipal governments, as well as with NGO leaders, academics, business leaders, and members of the media.

  • Program

    The National Committee regularly sends members of Congress to China, having arranged and escorted eight delegations since 2006. The week-long study tours are designed to educate the congressmen and women about China through personal introductions to senior Chinese leaders and a range of informative site visits and meetings.

  • Public Event

    At this program, Professor Wang Jisi, dean, School of International Studies, Peking University, reprised one of the themes raised in his 2005 Foreign Affairs article, “China’s Search for Stability with America,” (see the Sept/Oct 2005 Foreign Affairs issue) and focused on areas where Chinese and American interests converge and diverge in Asia.

  • Public Event

    Professor Lucian Pye and Professor Robert A. Scalapino, two distinguished scholars in the field of U.S.-China relations who have served as National Committee chairmen, discussed the founding of the National Committee, its work over the past 40 years and the role it might play in the future at a May 3 anniversary program in New York City. National Committee chair Carla Hills welcomed the many current and former directors, members and guests who attended the program.

  • Public Event

    On April 20, 2006, the National Committee co-hosted a dinner in Washington, DC in honor of Hu Jintao, president of the People’s Republic of China. This provided the occasion for President Hu’s only public address in Washington, DC. In his remarks, President Hu noted that U.S.-China relations have grown beyond the bilateral context and have become increasingly global in importance.

  • Public Event

    In his remarks, Ambassador Hill underscored the essential role of multilateralism in the Six-Party process, as it provided the means for different countries with the same interests to bear on the challenge of denuclearizing the Korean peninsula.

  • Program

    As part of an overall strategic review, the Rockefeller Foundation asked the National Committee to help it look at how China’s emergence affects the foundation’s strategies and goals. The China Project is an ongoing series of seminars and discussions begun in 2005 with the aim of providing the Foundation staff an opportunity to examine the global and regional impacts of China’s rise and its implications for Foundation programming around the world. The focus is on issues the Foundation staff identified as important to their programmatic goals.

  • Program

    Between 2000 and 2005, the National Committee held an essay contest in honor of the late scholar A. Doak Barnett. American and Chinese graduate students submitted 1,500-word essays on topics in U.S.-China relations, with authors of the best essays receiving rewards of $1,000.

  • Program

    George H.W. Bush and Deng Xiaoping met for the first time in October 1975, when an 18-member delegation of American leaders active in public education on world affairs visited China to discuss international issues.

  • Program

    Started in September 1984 as an off-the-record gathering of leading citizens of China and America, the U.S.-China Dialogue was the first formal instance of Track II diplomacy in the Sino-American relationship. It was held every 12-18 months, alternately in China and the United States, until 2002. 

  • Program

    In 2006, ten promising graduate students were selected from the United States to join with ten each from mainland China and Taiwan to participate in a National Committee's conflict resolution program.

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