Public Event
Author Zachary Karabell discussed his new book Superfusion: How China and America Became One Economy and Why the World's Prosperity Depends on It at the Jones Day offices in New York on November 12, 2009.  
Public Event
National Committee Director Edward Steinfeld discussed his new book, Playing Our Game: Why China's Rise Doesn't Threaten the West (Oxford University Press, 2010), at a Jones Day program on November 2.
Public Event
With the rise of tensions in Northeast Asia over the past few months, understanding the complex interactions among China, Japan and the two Koreas has become more important than ever, as has understanding the effect such tensions have on the United States and its interaction with these countries. The National Committee, in cooperation with the Japan Society, brought together three experts to provide insights into the current state of the regional security relationships: the Brookings Institution’s Richard Bush, the Eurasia Group’s Ian Bremmer, and Johns Hopkins University’s Kent Calder.
Public Event
In the spring of 2011, The Visionaries, a non-profit educational organization that produces a PBS program by the same name, approached the National Committee to create a documentary on our work and history. Now in its 17th season and hosted by actor Sam Waterston, The Visionaries profiles not-for-profit organizations around the world and is broadcast by PBS stations nationwide.
Public Event
National Committee director Dr. Kenneth Lieberthal discussed his new book, Managing the China Challenge: How to Achieve Corporate Success in the People's Republic, during a public program on May 24. Dr. Lieberthal's book focuses on the implications of China's political economy for multinational corporate strategies.
Public Event
The National Committee hosted a public program with Fred P. Hochberg, chairman and president of the Export-Import Bank of the United States, on U.S.-China trade tensions and opportunities.
Public Event
Mr. Fung offers his views on the multilateral trading system from the Asia/Pacific perspective and discusses ways to engage Asia in international forums, especially in light of the current economic environment.
Program
As part of an overall strategic review, the Rockefeller Foundation asked the National Committee to help it look at how China’s emergence affects the foundation’s strategies and goals. The China Project is an ongoing series of seminars and discussions begun in 2005 with the aim of providing the Foundation staff an opportunity to examine the global and regional impacts of China’s rise and its implications for Foundation programming around the world. The focus is on issues the Foundation staff identified as important to their programmatic goals.
Program
Between 2000 and 2005, the National Committee held an essay contest in honor of the late scholar A. Doak Barnett. American and Chinese graduate students submitted 1,500-word essays on topics in U.S.-China relations, with authors of the best essays receiving rewards of $1,000.
Program
George H.W. Bush and Deng Xiaoping met for the first time in October 1975, when an 18-member delegation of American leaders active in public education on world affairs visited China to discuss international issues.
Program
In July, 2008, the National Committee brought together 30 of the best minds on various aspects of China and several specialists in other areas for a synergistic, cross-cutting look at some of the major challenges facing China and the United States and what the best policies might be to enhance c
Program
The Master Teacher China Seminar is a half-day of China programming for some of the top educators in the country.
Program
During the opening months of the 113th session of Congress, the National Committee again organized a briefing for freshman Members of Congress on critical issues in the U.S.-China relationship. Headlined by Governor Jon Huntsman, former Ambassador to China (and a current National Committee Director), this session was the fourth of its kind in as many election cycles. Governor Huntsman drew on his vast experience with China to comment on the present-day bilateral relationship in an off-the-record session on Capitol Hill.
Program
In 2002, a consortium that included the National Committee, The Asia Foundation, and Worldwide Strategies, Inc. was awarded a multi-year contract by the U.S. Department of Labor to run a set of programs to improve Chinese labor laws. The overall goals were to help strengthen the Chinese government's capacity to develop laws and regulations to implement internationally recognized standards of workers' rights, to promote greater awareness of labor law among Chinese workers and employers, to strengthen industrial relations, and to improve legal aid services to women and migrant workers. The National Committee's mandate was to work on legislative and labor inspection issues.
Program
The National Committee's Annual Members Program consists of two components: a substantive discussion on some important aspect of the U.S.-China relationship which is preceded by a business meeting open only to NCUSCR members.

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The National Committee on United States-China Relations, Inc., welcomes financial and in-kind contributions. The Committee is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization and, as such, donations to it are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.