• Public Event

    Jeffrey Wasserstrom and Maura Cunningham outline how to understand China in the 21st century.

  • Public Event

    Jennifer Lin discusses her new book and Christianity in China. 

  • Public Event

    Dr. Pan Guang discusses Chinese engagement in the Middle East as well as opportunities and challenges posed by the Belt and Road Initiative.

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    This program is part of the 2017 CHINA Town Hall, one of over 80 programs hosted by local partners across the United States.

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    A briefing on the Belt and Road forum with leading Chinese scholars of economics and finance. 

  • Public Event

    Four former commanders of the U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM), in conversation with National Committee President Stephen A. Orlins, reflect on their time as leaders of the largest military command in the world.

  • Public Event

    Former Secretaries of State Madeleine Albright and Henry Kissinger reflect on the evolution of Sino-American relations and offer their views on the future of the relationship.

  • Public Event

    Professor Jerome A. Cohen discusses the political, legal, and economic ramifications of the present situation in the South China Sea, and analyzes the drivers of geopolitical competition in the region.

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    Philippe Le Corre discusses the current landscape of Europe-China relations, and his new book, China’s Offensive in Europe. 

  • Public Event

    Every morning, the national security advisor briefs the president of the United States on the world’s most pressing security threats, from ISIS to the Zika virus. Our collective security is increasingly reliant upon cooperation between the United States and China, whether it is minimizing the risk of conflict in the South China Sea, dealing with North Korea’s nuclear weapons program, or responding to climate change. We explore these issues and more in a program featuring former National Security Advisors Richard V. Allen, Stephen J. Hadley, and Robert McFarlane in conversation with National Committee President Steve Orlins.

  • Public Event

    Defense Secretaries Harold Brown, William Cohen, Chuck Hagel, and  William Perry, in conversation with National Committee President Steve Orlins, reflect on their experiences at DoD and the future of the U.S.-China security relationship.

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    Eric Liu pieces together a sense of the Chinese-American identity at a time when China is emerging at the center of the global scene.

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    In the waning years of the Cold War, the United States and China began to cautiously engage in cultural, educational, and policy exchanges, which in turn strengthened new security and economic ties. These links have helped shape the most important bilateral relationship in the late-twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.

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    When the Khmer Rouge came to power in Cambodia in 1975, they inherited a war-ravaged and internationally isolated country. Pol Pot’s government espoused the rhetoric of self-reliance, but Democratic Kampuchea was utterly dependent on Chinese foreign aid and technical assistance to survive. Yet in a markedly asymmetrical relationship between a modernizing, nuclear power and a virtually premodern state, China was largely unable to use its power to influence Cambodian politics or policy.

  • Public Event

    Since the end of the Cold War, China and Japan have faced each other as powers of relatively equal strength for the first time in their long history. As the two great powers of East Asia, the way they both compete and cooperate with each other, and the way they conduct their relations in the new era, will play a big part in the evolution of the region as a whole.

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