Public Event
On June 18, 2008, the National Committee co-hosted a dinner in Washington, DC, in honor of Wang Qishan, Vice Premier of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China. Informally concluding the 4th round of the U.S.-China Strategic Economic Dialogue (SED), the dinner provided the occasion for Vice Premier Wang and U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Paulson to give public addresses concerning SED’s progress.
Public Event
The National Committee hosted an informative discussion with Peter Wilson, political counsellor at the British Embassy in Beijing, on March 4, 2009, in New York. In his introductory comments and the roundtable discussion that followed, Mr.
Public Event
Alexandra Harney examines some of the reasons why China is able to offer such low prices on its manufactured goods. She also highlights the consequences of the “China price,” including the health and safety of workers and environmental degradation.
Program
The National Committee’s involvement in congressional delegations to China was renewed shortly after China National Offshore Oil Corporation’s (CNOOC) attempted acquisition of UNOCAL failed due to congressional objections. This was a vivid reminder of the importance of the American Congress in U.S.-China relations and the valuable role that the National Committee could play in congressional leadership education.
Program
The National Committee sends three bi-partisian delegations of congressional senior staff members to China each year for a study tour to learn first-hand about issues impacting China and the U.S.-China relationship. Delegation members travel to Beijing and other regions of China to meet with counterparts working for China's central, provincial, and municipal governments, as well as with NGO leaders, academics, business leaders, and members of the media.
Public Event
In early March, China’s central government proposed a defense budget for 2011 that increases military spending nearly 13 percent over 2010. As China expands and modernizes its armed forces, it holds an increasingly influential position in Asian-Pacific security.
Public Event
On April 20, 2006, the National Committee co-hosted a dinner in Washington, DC in honor of Hu Jintao, president of the People’s Republic of China. This provided the occasion for President Hu’s only public address in Washington, DC.
Public Event
In the waning years of the Cold War, the United States and China began to cautiously engage in cultural, educational, and policy exchanges, which in turn strengthened new security and economic ties. These links have helped shape the most important bilateral relationship in the late-twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.
Program
The National Committee’s Track II Strategic Security Dialogue (at times called the Northeast Asia Strategic Security Dialogue) began in 1999 and stemmed from an earlier National Committee mil/mil program and the joint Stanford-Harvard Preventive Defense Project (PDP), a research collaboration of Stanford University and Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government set up by former Secretary of Defense William Perry and Assistant Secretary Ash Carter.
Program
Started in September 1984 as an off-the-record gathering of leading citizens of China and America, the U.S.-China Dialogue was the first formal instance of Track II diplomacy in the Sino-American relationship. It was held every 12-18 months, alternately in China and the United States, until 2002. 
Public Event
Leading Taiwan scholar Dr. Shelley Rigger discussed her new book, Why Taiwan Matters (Rowman & Littlefield, 2011), at a Jones Day program on January 18, 2012.
Program
In June 2007, the National Committee worked with long-time partner, the National League of Cities (NLC), and new partner, the League of California Cities (LCC) on a ten-day study tour to Beijing, Qingdao and Shanghai for mayors, city council members, and the NLC and LCC leadership.
Program
Following a cooling of relations in the early 1990s, the National Committee revitalized the U.S.-China military dialogue, sending a group of retired four-star generals and admirals to China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan in 1994 and 1996. Since then, the success of this program has continued to foster constructive exchange, in addition to inspiring other programs like the U.S.-China Strategic Security Dialogue.

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