• Public Event

    M. Taylor Fravel examines the security threats China has faced over the past 70 years, investigating how and why the country’s defense strategies have changed.

  • Public Event

    A discussion focusing on how the United States and China have moved from strategic cooperation to strategic competition, and what can be done to help ease bilateral tensions.

  • Public Event

    This program is part of the 2017 CHINA Town Hall, one of over 80 programs hosted by local partners across the United States.

  • Public Event

    Four former commanders of the U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM), in conversation with National Committee President Stephen A. Orlins, reflect on their time as leaders of the largest military command in the world.

  • Public Event

    Dr. Sheena Greitens discusses China's internal security spending and what it says about contemporary China. 

  • Public Event

    Professor Jerome A. Cohen discusses the political, legal, and economic ramifications of the present situation in the South China Sea, and analyzes the drivers of geopolitical competition in the region.

  • Public Event

    At a National Committee program on Monday, March 18 Richard Bush, a senior fellow at Brookings, discussed his new book at Dorsey & Whitney in New York City.

  • Public Event

    Since 2007, the National Committee has run a series of multi-day briefings for mid-career officers in the United States armed services who have been fast-tracked for top leadership positions. The purpose of these seminars is to provide the participants with a general background on China and to brief them on issues not conventionally covered in their military training – such as China’s domestic politics, economic development, business and trade, foreign policy, rule of law, growth of civil society, environmental concerns and climate change, energy, and the use of soft power.

  • Public Event

    Despite its impressive size and population, economic vitality, and drive to upgrade its military capabilities, China remains a vulnerable nation surrounded by powerful rivals and potential foes. In China's Search for Security, authors Andrew J. Nathan and Andrew Scobell argue that the key to understanding China’s foreign policy is to grasp these geostrategic challenges, which persist even as the country comes to dominate its neighbors.

  • Program

    This dialogue convenes American and Chinese legal experts to explore the issues surrounding China’s recent maritime disputes and escalated tensions in the Pacific, better understand the impact on regional and U.S.-China relations, and provide suggestions for improving the management and settlement of current disputes.

  • Public Event

    On July 19, 2012, at the National Committee headquarters in New York City, a roundtable discussion on security issues in China was held featuring Dr. Xia Liping, dean of the School of Political Science & International Relations at Tongji University, and his colleagues Dr. Leng Xinyu (China University of Political Science and Law), and Dr. Dai Ying and Dr. Liu Yiqiang (Tsinghua University).

  • Public Event

    Dr. David M. Finkelstein, vice president of CNA, presents an overview of U.S.-China military relations – its current state, projected future, and essential developments.

  • Public Event

    In early March, China’s central government proposed a defense budget for 2011 that increases military spending nearly 13 percent over 2010. As China expands and modernizes its armed forces, it holds an increasingly influential position in Asian-Pacific security. China has been a crucial player in the Six Party Talks on North Korea’s nuclear proliferation during the last decade.

  • Public Event

    On April 7, the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations held a roundtable discussion with Professor David Zweig. He examined China’s search for energy and other resources and its impact on Sino-American relations. Professor Zweig proposed that, while China is rising as a world power, it is simplistic to say that this is China’s century: China is rising but doing so within a system that is still dominated by the United States, the “hegemon.” We should not think about China’s rise without considering the role and the responses of the United States.

  • Program

    In July, 2008, the National Committee brought together 30 of the best minds on various aspects of China and several specialists in other areas for a synergistic, cross-cutting look at some of the major challenges facing China and the United States and what the best policies might be to enhance cooperation and ameliorate conflict over them.

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