Public Event
Concern about the safety of products imported from China has added a new source of tension to U.S.-China trade relations.
Public Event
On April 20, 2006, the National Committee co-hosted a dinner in Washington, DC in honor of Hu Jintao, president of the People’s Republic of China. This provided the occasion for President Hu’s only public address in Washington, DC.
Public Event
Claire Reade gave a private, off the record talk to National Committee corporate members on the U.S. enforcement agenda with China. The U.S. Office of the Trade Representative (USTR) has launched a number of WTO cases against China in the past two years, and has managed other issues without going through the WTO. What makes one option preferable to another? What new challenges lie ahead?
Public Event
Mr. Fung offers his views on the multilateral trading system from the Asia/Pacific perspective and discusses ways to engage Asia in international forums, especially in light of the current economic environment.
Program
In July, 2008, the National Committee brought together 30 of the best minds on various aspects of China and several specialists in other areas for a synergistic, cross-cutting look at some of the major challenges facing China and the United States and what the best policies might be to enhance c
Public Event
In April 2007, the Council on Foreign Relations published the report of the independent task force it had convened to consider to a range of critical issues in the U.S.-China relationship. This distinguished group of specialists recommended that U.S.
Public Event
On June 18, 2008, the National Committee co-hosted a dinner in Washington, DC, in honor of Wang Qishan, Vice Premier of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China. Informally concluding the 4th round of the U.S.-China Strategic Economic Dialogue (SED), the dinner provided the occasion for Vice Premier Wang and U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Paulson to give public addresses concerning SED’s progress.

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