• Fact

    One of the venues for the NCUSCR-sponsored tour of the Shenyang Acrobats in 1972-73 was the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. The flag of the Republic of China hung in the Center's entryway, next to the flags of all other governments officially recognized by the United States.

  • Fact

    We conservatively estimate that the hundreds of teachers who participated in our Teachers Exchange Program (which ran from 1996 to 2014) collectively taught more than 142,000 students in Chinese and American classrooms, promoting better foreign language skills and deeper cross-cultural understanding.

  • Fact

    Two former U.S. Secretaries of State — Henry Kissinger and Madeleine Albright — have served on our board. (Dr. Kissinger continues to be one of our board's vice chairs.) Two others joined us for their first visits to China before taking that job: Cyrus Vance in 1975 and Condoleezza Rice in 1988.

  • Fact

    The National Committee has been involved with U.S.-China educational exchange for longer than the two countries have had diplomatic relations. In 1973, we sent the first group of American teachers to the People's Republic and welcomed back a group of Chinese language teachers. The following year, we sent the first group of American university and college presidents.

  • Fact

    From the '70s to the '90s, National Committee staffers escorting Chinese delegations around the States lugged a separate suitcase stuffed with electric kettles so that our Chinese visitors could make tea in their hotel rooms. The advent of in-room coffee makers was warmly welcomed!

  • Fact

    The National Committee's first benefactor was John D. Rockefeller III.  In 1966, he gave a personal gift of $20,000. Later that year the Rockefeller Brothers Fund pledged $300,000 over three years. This early Rockefeller association lent critical legitimacy — and prestige — to our fledgling organization.

  • Fact

    In 1975, when future president George H.W. Bush was stymied in his efforts to meet future PRC leader Deng Xiaoping, the National Committee played matchmaker. Bush, head of the U.S. Liaison Office, joined our delegation of civic leaders in a meeting with Deng, then first vice premier.

  • Fact

    Tragedies can create opportunities. In response to the chill in U.S.-China relations that followed the U.S.'s 1999 bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade, the Committee began conceptualizing next generation programming as an investment into better future bilateral communications.

  • Fact

    Providing participants an up-close perspective on life inside an American home and the opportunity to form close friendships with their hosts, local homestays have long been a feature of Committee itineraries for Chinese delegations visiting the United States. Although visitors often express trepidation ahead of time, afterwards they regularly cite their homestays as highlights of their visits.

  • Fact

    Chinese president Xi Jinping and his father Xi Zhongxun are just one of several notable father/son duos who have participated in our programs. As Guangdong's governor, the senior Xi led a 1980 provincial leaders delegation to the United States that the Committee arranged.

  • Fact

    The National Committee's granddaddy project of them all, the April 1972 visit of the Chinese Table Tennis Team to the United States, not only made history by turning "Ping Pong Diplomacy" into a household expression, but changed the NCUSCR's trajectory from its former focus on public education to becoming the premier organization capable of arranging exchanges between the United States and China — a mis

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