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China has made great strides in introducing a modern body of law and legal institutions over the course of the past 30 years. In the process, it also has raised the legal awareness and expectations of its citizens. Yet the country still faces major hurdles in enforcing laws, ensuring an independent judiciary and facilitating the access of ordinary citizens to the legal system.
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The evolving security environment in Northeast Asia continues to be a major focus for U.S. Pacific Command. Although events and trends have challenged regional stability, Northeast Asia remains stable and secure, enabling prosperity and growth. Admiral Timothy J. Keating, Commander, U.S.
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In his remarks, Ambassador Hill underscored the essential role of multilateralism in the Six-Party process, as it provided the means for different countries with the same interests to bear on the challenge of denuclearizing the Korean peninsula.
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Discussion with author David Shambaugh, professor of political science and international affairs, George Washington University.
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Dr. Lampton shares his perspective on how China’s strengths are changing, where vulnerabilities and uncertainties lie, and how the rest of the world, not least the United States, should view these trends.
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The December 2007 UN-sponsored Bali climate summit highlighted the main challenge to negotiating a post-Kyoto framework to address climate change: American and Chinese unwillingness to accept binding limits on greenhouse gas emissions.
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China’s judiciary is a key component in furthering development of the rule of law throughout the country. In recent years, the educational and professional standards of judges and the quality of judicial opinions have been raised, yet much work remains to be done in order to improve the administration of the courts, ensure enforcement of laws and judgments, and remove corrupt influences from the courts.
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James Heimowitz, President & CEO, North Asia and Chairman, China of Hill & Knowlton Asia Ltd., gave National Committee members an insider’s view of the media and public relations issues surrounding the Beijing Olympics.
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Rapid growth in China’s aviation sector – now estimated at 8.8 percent per year – increases the challenge of providing effective safety and system capacity.
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Business has been a driving force in expanding U.S.-China relations, and American companies of all sizes continue to enter the China market or expand their current operations at an unprecedented rate.
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Claire Reade gave a private, off the record talk to National Committee corporate members on the U.S. enforcement agenda with China. The U.S. Office of the Trade Representative (USTR) has launched a number of WTO cases against China in the past two years, and has managed other issues without going through the WTO. What makes one option preferable to another? What new challenges lie ahead?
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Fang Xinghai, an alumnus of the National Committee’s Young Leaders Forum and former deputy director of the Shanghai Stock Exchange, became deputy director of Shanghai’s Office of Financial Services in 2006.
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The National Committee hosted a ground-breaking visit to the United States by a ten-person delegation focusing on human rights, philanthropy, and economics. Led by Huang Mengfu, chairman of the China Foundation for Human Rights Development, the group was in the United States (New York, Washington, D.C. and Boston) November 16 through 24, 2008. The visit came at an opportune time, closely following China’s announcement that it is drafting a national action plan to protect human rights.
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Dr. Ashley Esarey, An Wang Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University, and Dr.
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On March 8, sixty miles off of Hainan Island, an American surveillance ship, the USNS Impeccable, and five Chinese ships were involved in what Director of National Intelligence Dennis C.

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