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As the greatest coal producing and consuming nation in the world, China would seem an unlikely haven for wind power. Yet the country now boasts a world-class industry that promises to make low-carbon technology more affordable and available to all.
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Susan Shirk, professor of political science at the Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, University of California, San Diego, discussed how the Internet and media are changing Chinese politics and vice versa during a National Committee program on April 25. Video of the program can be found below.
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In 2008 when Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor’s Professor of History at the University of California, Irvine, was working on his book, China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know, China was in the headlines: it was the year of the Olympic Games, a major earthquake in Sichuan, demonstrations in Tibet, environmental protests in the Yangzi Delta, and nationalist outbursts in Beijing.
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Sidney Rittenberg may not have the nine lives of a cat, but he has lived at least three: first, he spent his childhood in Charleston, S.C., going on to college in North Carolina; he then moved to China at the end of World War II, observing and participating in the Chinese revolution, remaining there for the next 35 years; he returned to the United States in 1980 to become a highly regarded consultant, advising major corporate clients on doing business in China.
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The United States-China relationship is at a critical juncture as both countries undergo great changes.
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Lee Kuan Yew, the first Prime Minister of the Republic of Singapore, is known around the world as an innovative leader and respected scholar of global strategy. Lee has been a mentor to every Chinese leader from Deng Xiaoping to Xi Jinping, and a counselor to every U.S. president from Richard Nixon to Barack Obama.
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At a National Committee program on Monday, March 18 Richard Bush, a senior fellow at Brookings, discussed his new book at Dorsey & Whitney in New York City.
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The National Committee on U.S.-China Relations celebrated its 45th Anniversary with a black-tie Gala Dinner on Monday, October 17th at 6:30pm at the Plaza Hotel in New York City. That evening the National Committee recognized John S. Watson, Chairman and CEO of Chevron, and Robert A. Iger, President and CEO of The Walt Disney Company. Both companies are dedicated supporters of the National Committee and constructive U.S.-China relations. Their long-term investments and philanthropy in China have helped strengthen bilateral relations.
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The National Committee joined the US-China Business Council as lead hosts for a dinner honoring PRC Vice Premier Wang Qishan and State Councilor Dai Bingguo in Washington, D.C. on July 28, 2009.
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Not since Nixon met Mao in ’72 have the top leaders from the United States and China engaged in such extended informal discussions as they did last week at Sunnylands. On Thursday, June 13, at 5 p.m.
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China will soon have the world’s largest economy, but authors Damien Ma and William Adams argue that China’s economic growth will constrain it, not empower it. As has been the case for much of its history, China will continue to be shaped by scarcity.
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In The China Fallacy: How the U.S. Can Benefit from China’s Rise and Avoid Another Cold War, Donald Gross challenges attempts to contain China and warns against protectionism.
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Chinese in America endured abuse and discrimination in the late 19th century, but they had a leader and a fighter in Wong Chin Foo (1847–1898), whose story is a forgotten chapter in the struggle for equal rights in America. 
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In her new book, Civil Society in China: The Legal Framework from Ancient Times to the “New Reform Era,” Catholic University Professor Karla Simon provides both an historical and contemporary analysis of the legal framework for civil society and citizen participation in China.
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In The Silk Road: A Very Short Introduction James Millward explores the historical background against which the silk road flourished, discusses the significance of old-world intercultural exchange, and puts the silk road into the context of world history. Professor Millward will discuss the historical significance and contemporary uses of the silk road at a National Committee program on May 16 at the Institute of International Education in New York City. Click below for a podcast interview with James Millward:

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