Public Event
In the waning years of the Cold War, the United States and China began to cautiously engage in cultural, educational, and policy exchanges, which in turn strengthened new security and economic ties. These links have helped shape the most important bilateral relationship in the late-twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.
Public Event
The Buddhist monk Tanxu surmounted extraordinary obstacles--poverty, wars, famine, and foreign occupation--to become one of the most prominent monks in China, founding numerous temples and schools, and attracting crowds of students and disciples wherever he went. Now, in Heart of Buddha, Heart of China: The Life of Tanxu, a Twentieth Century Monk, James Carter draws on untapped archival materials to provide a book that is part travelogue, part history, and part biography of this remarkable man.
Public Event
When the Khmer Rouge came to power in Cambodia in 1975, they inherited a war-ravaged and internationally isolated country. Pol Pot’s government espoused the rhetoric of self-reliance, but Democratic Kampuchea was utterly dependent on Chinese foreign aid and technical assistance to survive.
Public Event
Mary Brown Bullock, founding executive vice chancellor of DKU, discussed Duke Kunshan University in the context of the globalization of higher education.
Public Event
In his new book, Unbalanced: The Codependency of America and China, Stephen Roach examines the pitfalls of the current U.S.-China economic relationship.
Public Event
Mr. Fung offers his views on the multilateral trading system from the Asia/Pacific perspective and discusses ways to engage Asia in international forums, especially in light of the current economic environment.
Public Event
The National Committee hosted a program with Congressmen Charles Boustany (R-LA) and Rick Larsen (D-WA) at the New York University School of Law. The two co-chairs of the bipartisan U.S.-China Working Group shared their perspectives on China and discussed potential China-related legislation.
Public Event
Assignment: China - Tiananmen Square tells the behind-the-scenes story of the American reporters who covered the tumultuous events of spring 1989 in Beijing.
Public Event
At a National Committee public program on May 19, author Michael Meyer discussed living in one of Beijing's oldest hutongs, a traditional alleyway neighborhood which defined the city's layout for centuries. Mr. Meyer's first book, The Last Days of Old Beijing, chronicles the destruction of many of these neighborhoods as the city was redesigned for the 2008 Summer Olympics.
Public Event
A century ago, Chinese feminists fighting for the emancipation of women helped spark the Republican Revolution, which overthrew the Qing empire. After China's Communist revolution of 1949, Chairman Mao famously proclaimed that "women hold up half the sky." In the early years of the People's Republic, the Communist Party sought to transform gender relations with expansive initiatives including the Marriage Law and assigning urban women jobs. Those gains have been eroded in the post-socialist era; women in China have experienced a dramatic rollback of many rights and gains relative to men.
Public Event
Dr. Jessica Chen Weiss explores the role of nationalism and popular protest in China's foreign relations.
Public Event
China’s energy policy exerts a profound influence on the global economy and the environment. To better understand the future trajectory of China’s energy needs, the National Committee hosted China Energy 2020.
Public Event
In this thought-provoking book, noted China experts from Harvard Business School and the Wharton School assert that while China has experienced remarkable economic growth in recent decades, it now faces major challenges--tests that could shift the country's political and economic trajectory.
Program
As part of an overall strategic review, the Rockefeller Foundation asked the National Committee to help it look at how China’s emergence affects the foundation’s strategies and goals. The China Project is an ongoing series of seminars and discussions begun in 2005 with the aim of providing the Foundation staff an opportunity to examine the global and regional impacts of China’s rise and its implications for Foundation programming around the world. The focus is on issues the Foundation staff identified as important to their programmatic goals.
Program
The National Committee programmed a week-long trip to Beijing and Shanghai for Michael Moskow, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

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