• Program

    A U.S.-China Subnational Symposium was held at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, April 23-24, 2019, bringing together over 30 officials from 25 U.S. states who work on China issues in the areas of trade and investment, education, culture, agriculture, and development. In this time of heightened tensions in the U.S.-China relationship, the symposium sought to educate, foster coordination, and develop best practices among participants.

  • Public Event

    What does the future hold for Hong Kong? Will it become just another Chinese city that makes up the Greater Bay Area? The speakers, who have been tracking issues relating to higher education, journalism, protest, and the arts, address Hong Kong's future under Chinese rule.

  • Public Event

    Dr. Weijian Shan recounts his life story, which took him from a childhood in Beijing to a decade in Inner Mongolia during the Cultural Revolution, and then on to graduate school in the United States, in an extraordinary new memoir.

  • Public Event

    Professors Rory Truex and Benjamin Liebman discuss challenges faced by American China scholars amid allegations of censorship and self-censorship.  

  • Public Event

    Peggy Blumenthal and David Zweig discuss the impact of Chinese students on American academic institutions and what happens when the students return to China.

  • Public Event

    Gerard Postiglione discusses China's higher education model and its global ambitions in the Belt and Road era. 

  • Public Event

    Mary Brown Bullock, founding executive vice chancellor of DKU, discussed Duke Kunshan University in the context of the globalization of higher education.

  • Public Event

    Some 130,000 students from China now study a variety of fields in colleges and universities around the United States. What about the first Chinese students in this country? In a lecture and discussion at the Luce Foundation offices in New York, Edward Rhoads shared stories and research from his new book Stepping Forth into the World: The Chinese Educational Mission to the United States, 1872-81, which examines the individual and collective histories of the first 120 Chinese students in the United States.

  • Program

    The Master Teacher China Seminar is a half-day of China programming for some of the top educators in the country.

  • Program

    Administered by the Committee from 1981 to 2015, the Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program sent American pre-collegiate and college-level educators to several cities in China for 4-5 weeks each summer. It offered an opportunity to gain valuable, first-hand insights into a country that has become an important element in American education across the curriculum. Through the intensive program of briefings and site visits, educators enhanced their ability to teach about Chinese culture, history, politics, economics, and other areas.

  • Program

    Between 1996 and 2014, the U.S.-China Teachers Exchange Program, established with funding from the Freeman Foundation, sent American K-12 teachers to China and brought Chinese secondary school teachers to the United States. Since the program began, 116 American teachers taught in Chinese secondary schools, and 332 Chinese teachers taught in American elementary, middle, and high schools.

  • Program

    The National Committee's Time Warner Internship Program enabled fourth-year Fudan University students with an interest in journalism and media to participate in a three-month internship at various Time Warner entities in the United States. Over the course of the program's nine year span, a total of 39 students were given the opportunity to work at Time and Fortune magazines, CNN, Warner Bros. Studios, HBO, and Warner Music, among other divisions.

  • Program

    From 1981 to 2015, the National Committee administered a program on behalf of the U.S. Department of Education to bring delegations of educators and educational administrators from across China to the United States. Twice each year, participants selected by the Chinese Ministry of Education had an opportunity to learn about the strengths and challenges of various aspects of the American education system and its institutions and organizations.

Connect with Us

Support Us

The National Committee on United States-China Relations, Inc., welcomes financial and in-kind contributions. The Committee is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization and, as such, donations to it are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.