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    Meg Rithmire is the F. Warren McFarlan Associate Professor in the Business, Government, and International Economy Unit at Harvard Business School (HBS). She holds a Ph.D. in government from Harvard University (2011), and is a comparative political scientist with a focus on China and Asia.

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    Xiaoyu Pu is an associate professor of political science at the University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Pu was born in 1979 in Sichuan, China, and grew up there. He received his B.A. and M.A. in political science from Nankai University in Tianjin. After moving to the United States, he got another M.A. from Kent State University and eventually received his Ph.D. in political science from The Ohio State University. In the 2012-13 academic year, he was a postdoctoral fellow in the Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program at Princeton University. In 2016, he was a Stanton Fellow at Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV) in Brazil. He started working as an assistant professor of political science at University of Nevada, Reno in 2013. Dr. Pu was promoted to the rank of associate professor with tenure in 2019. He is also a non-resident senior fellow at the Inter-American Dialogue in Washington, D.C. His teaching and research focus on Chinese foreign policy, East Asian politics, emerging world powers (BRICS), and international relations theory.

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    Jonas Nahm is assistant professor of energy, resources, and environment at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS).

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    Scott Moore is a researcher and policymaker focused on emerging environmental and technological challenges. Dr. Moore is currently director of the Penn Global China Program in the Office of the Provost at the University of Pennsylvania, where he works with faculty across the university to design and conduct research on emerging challenges facing China and the world, including climate change, artificial intelligence, and gene editing. Dr. Moore’s own research focuses on environmental politics and policy, especially water resources.

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    Russell Menyhart’s interest in China began when he first arrived in the country, as a student, two days before the 1997 Hong Kong handover. More than twenty years later, he is no less fascinated by China’s political and economic developments than he was by the introduction of ‘one country, two systems’ at the time. He has since spent seven years in China as a student, teacher, and diplomat, separated by stints in the United States, England, and Argentina. After a decade as a diplomat with the U.S. State Department, including postings in Beijing, Shanghai, Washington, D.C., and Buenos Aires, he now practices law as a partner at Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP in Indianapolis. Mr. Menyhart co-chairs Taft’s international and China practice groups and represents both U.S. and Chinese clients on a wide range of complex legal matters.

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    Tabitha Grace Mallory is founder and CEO of the China Ocean Institute and an affiliate professor of the University of Washington Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies. Dr. Mallory specializes in Chinese foreign and environmental policy. She is currently conducting research on China and global ocean governance and has published work on China’s fisheries and oceans policy.

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    Yingyi Ma is an associate professor of sociology and the director of Asian/Asian American studies at Syracuse University. She is also a senior research associate at the Center for Policy Research in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. Dr.

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    Ya-Wen Lei is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at Harvard University, and is affiliated with the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard. She grew up in Taipei, Taiwan. Dr. Lei holds a J.S.D.

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    Isaac B. Kardon, Ph.D., is an assistant professor at the U.S Naval War College (NWC) in the Department of Strategic and Operational Research. He is a core member of the China Maritime Studies Institute (CMSI), where he researches and writes on maritime disputes, Indo-Pacific maritime security and commerce, China-Pakistan relations, and the law of the sea.

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    Kelly Hammond is an assistant professor in the Department of History at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. Dr. Hammond received her Ph.D. in East Asian history from Georgetown University in July 2015. Her work specializes in the history of Islam in East Asia, particularly focusing on the political, social, and cultural history of Chinese Muslims from the Qing Dynasty through into the People’s Republic of China.

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    Arunabh Ghosh is a historian of twentieth century China with interests in social, economic, and environmental history, (transnational) histories of science and statecraft, and China-India history. He is currently an assistant professor in the History Department at Harvard University.

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    Diana Fu is an associate professor of political science at The University of Toronto and an affiliate of the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy Asian Institute. Dr. Fu's research examines popular contention, state power, civil society, and citizenship, with a focus on contemporary China. Her book Mobilizing Without the Masses: Control and Contention in China (2018, Cambridge Studies in Contentious Politics Series) theorizes a counter-intuitive form of mobilization under authoritarian rule. It won the 2018 American Political Science Association’s Luebbert Prize for the best book in comparative politics, the 2019 International Studies Association’s best book award in international political sociology, and the 2019 Charles Tilly Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Book Award from the American Sociological Association.

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    Peilei Fan is an associate professor of urban and regional planning at the School of Planning, Design, and Construction, Michigan State University (MSU). She also holds a joint research appointment at the Center for Global Change and Earth Observations and is an adjunct faculty member of the Department of Geography, Environment, and Spatial Science at MSU. She has a Ph.D. in economic development and an M.S. in electrical engineering and computer science, both from MIT.

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    Iza Ding is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Pittsburgh, with a secondary appointment in public policy at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. As a scholar of political development and legacies across the communist and post-communist world, she uses diverse methodological tools to explore pressing public policy issues. She has active projects in the realms of environmental policy, legal development, bureaucratic organizations, and public opinion. Dr. Ding received her Ph.D. in government from Harvard University, and her B.A. from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, earning a dual degree in political science and Russian and Eastern European studies. She has in-depth knowledge and field experience in China, Poland, Vietnam, and North Korea.

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    Lenora Chu is a journalist and author of the award-winning Little Soldiers, a narrative account of China’s education system. She is also Shanghai bureau chief of the nonprofit Christian Science Monitor. With 15 years’ experience in the United States and China, Lenora’s work illuminates the intersection of culture, education, and global competitiveness — a passion borne in part of growing up with Chinese parents in America.

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