• Public Event

    Dori Jones Yang's memoir describes her introduction to China as a correspondent during the excitement of the early reform era.

  • Public Event

    Michael Schuman describes how China’s view of itself through history informs its perceptions of its position in the world today.

  • Public Event

    Paul Pickowicz visited China in 1971 as one of 14 American graduate students with a Committee of Concerned Asian Scholars delegation.

  • Public Event

    Jennifer Ho and John Pomfret discussed the history of anti-Chinese/Asian racism in the U.S., the impact of coronavirus-related racism, and the importance of uniting across our communities to stand up against all forms of discrimination.

  • Public Event

    Professor James Carter explores the overlapping and contending worlds of 1940’s Shanghai in Champions Day: The End of Old Shanghai.

  • Public Event

    M. Taylor Fravel examines the security threats China has faced over the past 70 years, investigating how and why the country’s defense strategies have changed.

  • Public Event

    Dr. Ezra Vogel examines the long history of Sino-Japanese relations, arguing that both sides must acknowledge the other country’s grievances for their own sake, as well as for the benefit of the region and the world.

  • Public Event

    Stephen R. Platt discusses his new book, offering a unique perspective on one of the most consequential events in Chinese history.

  • Public Event

    Daniel Kurtz-Phelan discusses his new book and the impact of General Marshall’s mission to China on American domestic and foreign policy.

  • Public Event

    Dr. Denise Ho discusses her new book, museum curation, and the narrative legacy of China's historical artifacts.

  • Public Event

    Howard French discusses how China's imperial past helps shape its quest for global influence and offers strategies for engaging a resurgent China.

  • Public Event

    Richard Bernstein discusses his new book, China 1945, which examines the first episode in which American power and good intentions came face-to-face with a formidable Chinese revolutionary movement.

  • Public Event

    The Buddhist monk Tanxu surmounted extraordinary obstacles--poverty, wars, famine, and foreign occupation--to become one of the most prominent monks in China, founding numerous temples and schools, and attracting crowds of students and disciples wherever he went. Now, in Heart of Buddha, Heart of China: The Life of Tanxu, a Twentieth Century Monk, James Carter draws on untapped archival materials to provide a book that is part travelogue, part history, and part biography of this remarkable man.

  • Public Event

    Chinese in America endured abuse and discrimination in the late 19th century, but they had a leader and a fighter in Wong Chin Foo (1847–1898), whose story is a forgotten chapter in the struggle for equal rights in America. 

  • Public Event

    In The Silk Road: A Very Short Introduction James Millward explores the historical background against which the silk road flourished, discusses the significance of old-world intercultural exchange, and puts the silk road into the context of world history. Professor Millward will discuss the historical significance and contemporary uses of the silk road at a National Committee program on May 16 at the Institute of International Education in New York City. Click below for a podcast interview with James Millward:

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