• Program

    At the invitation of the People's Bank of China, a delegation of American banking specialists traveled to several Chinese cities to offer workshops on the development of a modern banking system in 1994.

  • Program

    In 1989, after the National People's Congress adopted legislation that permitted Chinese citizens to sue their government, the National Committee invited a delegation of seven Chinese legal experts — responsible for drafting legislation guiding government liability — to study the American legal system.

  • Program

    In 1989, trade and economic issues played a major role in the United States' relationship with Southeast Asia, and people from that region desired a better understanding of how the American economy functioned and affected the global economy. This was the first regional program carried out by the National Committee: the delegation was comprised of 11 Cantonese-speaking journalists from the PRC, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Malaysia.

  • Program

    In the summer of 1996, the National Committee brought together a group of NGO experts from the United States, Canada, and Thailand to meet with NGO leaders in Greater China.

  • Program

    In 1990, as Congress debated whether to renew trade benefits for China after the break over Tiananmen, the National Committee organized the first post-Tiananmen visit of a high-level Chinese delegation to the United States. Led by Shanghai mayor and future PRC premier Zhu Rongji, the delegation included former Shanghai mayor Wang Daohan and the mayors of Wuhan, Chongqing, Taiyuan, Hefei, and Ningbo — six of China's largest and most outward-looking cities.

  • Program

    In July, 2008, the National Committee brought together 30 of the best minds on various aspects of China and several specialists in other areas for a synergistic, cross-cutting look at some of the major challenges facing China and the United States and what the best policies might be to enhance cooperation and ameliorate conflict over them.

  • Supporting Material / The UK and China: A Framework for Engagement
  • Public Event

    The National Committee hosted an informative discussion with Peter Wilson, political counsellor at the British Embassy in Beijing, on March 4, 2009, in New York. In his introductory comments and the roundtable discussion that followed, Mr. Wilson addressed issues of U.K.-China relations, focusing on The UK and China: A Framework for Engagement, which was recently released by the U.K.

  • Supporting Material / Learning / U.S.-China Teachers Exchange Program

    I went to attend the teacher's conference held in White Mountains last weekend. It is called exploring art in the nature. It is so wonderful. Some artists, writers like Clare Walker, storytellers like Rebecca Rule, musicians, composers, dancers went to the Crawford North and taught art or music teachers in this area about new ways in applying art in education. I enjoyed it quite a lot. I went to the workshop of a Nigerian artist and worked for him as his assistant.

  • Supporting Material / Learning / U.S.-China Teachers Exchange Program

    Before I arrived in America, I heard varied opinions of American classes and kids. I felt really horrified when I thought that I had to face the challenges. It almost ruined my first ten days before the school started in Gilmore Academy. Anyhow things happened as they should happen.

  • Supporting Material / Learning / U.S.-China Teachers Exchange Program

    [T]oday is a big day for all the Americans and of course the world. We can't miss it. So at 11:30, all the faculty and the students went to the Old South church near Snowden [International School, MA] and watched the inauguration live on TV. The church was full of people, including a lot of local citizens. Some of them were formally dressed up. One black lady in a beautiful red dress said, "I have no choice.

  • Supporting Material / Celebrating / U.S.-China Teachers Exchange Program

    It’s Chinese New Year! Well in advance I decorated my classroom with lanterns and colored streamers to make it look festive! For class I prepared many holiday related activities such as having my students make lanterns, ox masks and paper cuttings, sing holiday songs, write Chinese calligraphy, make dumplings out of play dough and then eat the fried dumplings I made.

  • Supporting Material / Teaching / U.S.-China Teachers Exchange Program

    Students told me they wanted to learn American songs. Every week I teach them the names and locations of one or two new states, so I played “Sweet Home Alabama” as a way to introduce that state.

  • Supporting Material / Celebrating / U.S.-China Teachers Exchange Program

    On the first day of Chinese New Year, we had a small parade at school. We talked to some teachers the day before New Year and paraded into their classrooms including the main office on New Year's Day. We asked the students questions about Chinese New Year and handed out red envelopes to those who gave the right answers. (Actually, a few days before that we had put up posters with information about Spring Festival.) We even served them with more than 200 dumplings.

  • Supporting Material / Alumni / U.S.-China Teachers Exchange Program

    Guan Yi taught at P.S. 120 in Queens, NY during the 1996-97 school year.

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