Public Event
At this program, Professor Wang Jisi, dean, School of International Studies, Peking University, reprised one of the themes raised in his 2005 Foreign Affairs article, “China’s Search for Stability with America,” (see the Sept/Oct 2005 Foreign Affairs issue) and focused on areas where Chinese and American interests converge and diverge in Asia.
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Jack Perkowski, chairman and CEO of ASIMCO Technologies, gave National Committee members and guests a snapshot view of his experiences in building an automotive parts business in China.
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Following a decision to bring greater transparency to process, the Chinese government started sending delegations abroad to give further clarification of policies adopted at the recent 17th Party Congress. While other delegations have been sent to Japan, Russia, the European Union and Southeast Asia, this particular delegation – with its three principal members having played instrumental roles in developing the policies for political reform that were set out at the Party Congress – came to the United States to give further explication to American China-watchers.
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Leadership changes announced at China’s 17th Party Congress are expected to give an indication of President Hu Jintao’s ability to consolidate his political power, as well as early signs of who may contend to succeed him as China’s top leader in five years’ time. Dr.
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Concern about the safety of products imported from China has added a new source of tension to U.S.-China trade relations.
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David Denoon, an economist and political scientist on the faculty of New York University, gave National Committee members and guests an overview of the key findings of his recently published study, The Economic and Strategic Rise of China and India: Asian Realignments After the 1997 Financial Crisis. This public program was held on the evening of January 8 in New York.
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How do citizens in a rising China view the world? How do their views differ from those of Americans? And how do Americans and Chinese view each other? Andrew Kohut and Victor Yuan drew on public opinion surveys conducted by their respective organizations to identify similarities and differences in the international outlooks of American and Chinese citizens, and consider the implications for policy-makers in both countries.
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China has made great strides in introducing a modern body of law and legal institutions over the course of the past 30 years. In the process, it also has raised the legal awareness and expectations of its citizens. Yet the country still faces major hurdles in enforcing laws, ensuring an independent judiciary and facilitating the access of ordinary citizens to the legal system.
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The evolving security environment in Northeast Asia continues to be a major focus for U.S. Pacific Command. Although events and trends have challenged regional stability, Northeast Asia remains stable and secure, enabling prosperity and growth. Admiral Timothy J. Keating, Commander, U.S.
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In his remarks, Ambassador Hill underscored the essential role of multilateralism in the Six-Party process, as it provided the means for different countries with the same interests to bear on the challenge of denuclearizing the Korean peninsula.
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Discussion with author David Shambaugh, professor of political science and international affairs, George Washington University.
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Dr. Lampton shares his perspective on how China’s strengths are changing, where vulnerabilities and uncertainties lie, and how the rest of the world, not least the United States, should view these trends.
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The December 2007 UN-sponsored Bali climate summit highlighted the main challenge to negotiating a post-Kyoto framework to address climate change: American and Chinese unwillingness to accept binding limits on greenhouse gas emissions.
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China’s judiciary is a key component in furthering development of the rule of law throughout the country. In recent years, the educational and professional standards of judges and the quality of judicial opinions have been raised, yet much work remains to be done in order to improve the administration of the courts, ensure enforcement of laws and judgments, and remove corrupt influences from the courts.
Public Event
James Heimowitz, President & CEO, North Asia and Chairman, China of Hill & Knowlton Asia Ltd., gave National Committee members an insider’s view of the media and public relations issues surrounding the Beijing Olympics.

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