Program
As part of an overall strategic review, the Rockefeller Foundation asked the National Committee to help it look at how China’s emergence affects the foundation’s strategies and goals. The China Project is an ongoing series of seminars and discussions begun in 2005 with the aim of providing the Foundation staff an opportunity to examine the global and regional impacts of China’s rise and its implications for Foundation programming around the world. The focus is on issues the Foundation staff identified as important to their programmatic goals.
Program
The National Committee programmed a week-long trip to Beijing and Shanghai for Michael Moskow, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
Program
Between 2000 and 2005, the National Committee held an essay contest in honor of the late scholar A. Doak Barnett. American and Chinese graduate students submitted 1,500-word essays on topics in U.S.-China relations, with authors of the best essays receiving rewards of $1,000.
Program
In 2003, the Ford Foundation commissioned the National Committee to conduct a survey of programs addressing Sino-American relations and security issues. The resulting report was updated in 2005 and again in 2006.
Program
In the summer of 1996, the National Committee brought together a group of NGO experts from the United States, Canada, and Thailand to meet with NGO leaders in Greater China.
Program
National Committee director Geraldine Kunstadter invited fellow directors and staff members to dinner at her home on April 22 to welcome Chinese Ambassador to the United Nations Zhang Yesui and Consul General of the Chinese Consulate in New York, Ambassador Peng Keyu, and their spouses to New York.
Program
In February 2005, the National Committee brought seven Chinese legal aid professionals to the United States to spend five weeks examining the governance and administration of American professional legal service organizations.
Program
In 1989, trade and economic issues played a major role in the United States' relationship with Southeast Asia, and people from that region desired a better understanding of how the American economy functioned and affected the global economy. This was the first regional program carried out by the National Committee: the delegation was comprised of 11 Cantonese-speaking journalists from the PRC, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Malaysia.
Program
In 2006, the National Committee and Tsinghua University Center for Cultural Industry partnered to convene a U.S.-China Media/Culture Policy Forum in New York. American and Chinese media experts met to examine how national and local governments can successfully foster the development of media and cultural industries.
Program
With limited funds at their disposal, China's NGOs are increasing their human resource pool and engaging their communities by utilizing volunteers to fulfill their missions. It is within this context that the Strengthening Volunteer Management in Chinese NGOs project was developed in 2005, with the goal of providing Chinese NGO professionals practical training in volunteer management.
Program
The National Committee hosted a roundtable discussion with Ambassador Wu Jianmin, former Chinese ambassador to France and former president of the China Foreign Affairs University on September 9, 2009, in New York. Ambassador Wu was joined by Ambassador Lü Fengding, former Chinese ambassador to Sweden; Dr. Zhang Yuyan, director of the Institute of World Economics and Politics at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences; and Ms. Xu Heming, deputy director of the Foreign Ministry Department of Policy Planning.
Program
Six editors of American foreign policy and political affairs journals traveled to Beijing, Shanghai, and Taipei to gain a greater understanding of Chinese foreign policy issues.
Program
In 2006, ten promising graduate students were selected from the United States to join with ten each from mainland China and Taiwan to participate in a National Committee's conflict resolution program.
Program
Despite differences in political traditions and practices, municipal government officials in the United States, mainland China, and Taiwan share interests in delivering services to citizens, promoting economic development, and managing government resources.
Program
The National Committee co-organized a conference with the School of Finance of Renmin University of China in Beijing in July 2006. The conference focused on the changing dynamics between China's central and provincial governments through the lens of fiscal reform.

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The National Committee on United States-China Relations, Inc., welcomes financial and in-kind contributions. The Committee is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization and, as such, donations to it are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.