Program
The purpose of these seminars for mid-career U.S. military officers who have been fast-tracked for top leadership positions but do not focus on China in their daily work is to provide them with a background on China and to brief them on issues not conventionally covered in their military training — issues such as China's domestic politics, economic development, business and trade, foreign policy, rule of law, growth of civil society, environmental concerns and climate change, energy, and the use of soft power.
Program
During the opening months of the 113th session of Congress, the National Committee again organized a briefing for freshman Members of Congress on critical issues in the U.S.-China relationship. Headlined by Governor Jon Huntsman, former Ambassador to China (and a current National Committee Director), this session was the fourth of its kind in as many election cycles. Governor Huntsman drew on his vast experience with China to comment on the present-day bilateral relationship in an off-the-record session on Capitol Hill.
Program
In September 1973, the National Committee helped facilitate the Philadelphia Orchestra's historic trip to China, paving the way for other American orchestras. The Boston Symphony followed in 1979.
Program
In 2011, the National Committee, in partnership with the Center for Legal Assistance to Pollution Victims at China University of Political Science and Law, sponsored a two-way exchange for environmental law professionals in China and the United States.
Program
Following a cooling of relations in the early 1990s, the National Committee revitalized the U.S.-China military dialogue, sending a group of retired four-star generals and admirals to China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan in 1994 and 1996. Since then, the success of this program has continued to foster constructive exchange, in addition to inspiring other programs like the U.S.-China Strategic Security Dialogue.
Program
From 1981 to 2015, the National Committee administered a program on behalf of the U.S. Department of Education to bring delegations of educators and educational administrators from across China to the United States.
Program
In 2002, a consortium that included the National Committee, The Asia Foundation, and Worldwide Strategies, Inc. was awarded a multi-year contract by the U.S. Department of Labor to run a set of programs to improve Chinese labor laws. The overall goals were to help strengthen the Chinese government's capacity to develop laws and regulations to implement internationally recognized standards of workers' rights, to promote greater awareness of labor law among Chinese workers and employers, to strengthen industrial relations, and to improve legal aid services to women and migrant workers. The National Committee's mandate was to work on legislative and labor inspection issues.
Program
Administered by the Committee from 1981 to 2015, the Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program sent American pre-collegiate and college-level educators to several cities in China for 4-5 weeks each summer. It offered an opportunity to gain valuable, first-hand insights into a country that has become an important element in American education across the curriculum. Through the intensive program of briefings and site visits, educators enhanced their ability to teach about Chinese culture, history, politics, economics, and other areas.
Program
The National Committee's Annual Members Program consists of two components: a substantive discussion on some important aspect of the U.S.-China relationship which is preceded by a business meeting open only to NCUSCR members.
Program
The National Committee’s involvement in congressional delegations to China was renewed shortly after China National Offshore Oil Corporation’s (CNOOC) attempted acquisition of UNOCAL failed due to congressional objections. This was a vivid reminder of the importance of the American Congress in U.S.-China relations and the valuable role that the National Committee could play in congressional leadership education.
Program
A variety of people and institutions have shaped the course of U.S.-China relations over the past five decades. Leaders Speak is a series of public forums that highlights the different roles decision-makers have played in determining the path of the most important bilateral relationship in the 21st century.
Program
The National Committee's Time Warner Internship Program enabled fourth-year Fudan University students with an interest in journalism and media to participate in a three-month internship at various Time Warner entities in the United States. Over the course of the program's nine year span, a total of 39 students were given the opportunity to work at Time and Fortune magazines, CNN, Warner Bros. Studios, HBO, and Warner Music, among other divisions.

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The National Committee on United States-China Relations, Inc., welcomes financial and in-kind contributions. The Committee is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization and, as such, donations to it are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law.