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This conference provides an opportunity for a small group of young Chinese and Americans from the academic, policy, and media worlds to gather for a free-flowing discussion of global issues that affect contemporary affairs.
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The Diplomat Orientation Program (DOP) is an intensive two-week study tour that provides mid-career Chinese diplomats with a deeper, more hands-on understanding of America’s history and values and how these may shape American policies and perspectives. Through a varied mix of meetings and site visits ranging from the New York Stock Exchange to a dairy farm in central Pennsylvania, participants have the opportunity to engage in direct dialogue with Americans outside their particular spheres of expertise.
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American and Chinese experts from academia, think tanks, and industry gather for a two-day dialogue exploring how significant climate change and energy developments are altering each country's energy outlook.
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The National Committee’s Track II Strategic Security Dialogue (at times called the Northeast Asia Strategic Security Dialogue) began in 1999 and stemmed from an earlier National Committee mil/mil program and the joint Stanford-Harvard Preventive Defense Project (PDP), a research collaboration of Stanford University and Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government set up by former Secretary of Defense William Perry and Assistant Secretary Ash Carter.
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A new partnership between the National Committee and the Schwarzman Scholars program engages Schwarzman Scholars at all stages, helping further prepare them for leadership roles in the U.S.-China relationship. Through the partnership, current Schwarzman Scholars, recent graduates, and alumni have opportunities to learn from and engage with policymakers, policy influencers, and leading China experts in the National Committee’s network.
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Watch the national webcast with Condoleezza Rice, former secretary of state and national security advisor. CHINA Town Hall 2018 took place at 100+ venues across the United States and China on October 9, 2018. The national webcast was preceded or followed by in-person discussions with China specialists at each of the venues.
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Between 1996 and 2014, the U.S.-China Teachers Exchange Program, established with funding from the Freeman Foundation, sent American K-12 teachers to China and brought Chinese secondary school teachers to the United States.
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Launched in 2018, this new initiative is designed to provide senior corporate leaders with a more holistic view of China, enabling them to better understand the issues faced by their U.S. and China-based staff; it is also designed to better equip them to engage in internal company discussions vis-à-vis China. The briefings touch on issues not routinely examined in the business world, including China’s domestic politics, foreign relations, rule of law, culture, and society.
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The U.S. Foreign Policy Colloquium is an exclusive four-day program designed to provide 75 of the best and brightest Chinese graduate students studying at colleges and universities from across the United States a deeper and more nuanced understanding of the complex forces that shape American foreign policy and inform the U.S.-China relationship.
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Eight months after the Chinese ping pong team visited the United States, the National Committee made history again by hosting the first performing arts company from the People's Republic of China — the Shenyang Acrobatic Troupe — for a four-week, four-city tour.
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Started in September 1984 as an off-the-record gathering of leading citizens of China and America, the U.S.-China Dialogue was the first formal instance of Track II diplomacy in the Sino-American relationship.  It was held every 12-18 months, alternately in China and the United States, until 2002. 
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While a few staff members had joined their bosses on early trips to China made by the Senate and House leadership, it was the National Committee, in the summer of 1976, that sent the first group composed solely of staff members to China. This presaged the MEACA (Mutual Education and Cultural Act) program the Committee currently runs for both D.C and state/district-based staff members.
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Under the National Committee's auspices, a delegation of 17 young American political leaders — some serving in elected positions at the state or local level, others leaders of political organizations — visited the People's Republic of China in May 1977. Assembled with the cooperation of the American Council of Young Political Leaders, it was the first such visit of its kind.
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The National Committee brought the first group of Chinese mayors and deputy mayors to U.S. soil in September, 1978. Led by Beijing Deputy Mayor Zhao Pengfei and Shanghai Deputy Mayor Yen Yumin, the 19-member delegation also included city planners, architects, and engineers. The visit was the first of approximately 50 exchanges the Committee has sponsored in the area of municipal and state/provincial management and planning.
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The National Committee sends three bi-partisian delegations of congressional senior staff members to China each year for a study tour to learn first-hand about issues impacting China and the U.S.-China relationship. Delegation members travel to Beijing and other regions of China to meet with counterparts working for China's central, provincial, and municipal governments, as well as with NGO leaders, academics, business leaders, and members of the media.

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