• Program

    The National Committee's Time Warner Internship Program enabled fourth-year Fudan University students with an interest in journalism and media to participate in a three-month internship at various Time Warner entities in the United States. Over the course of the program's nine year span, a total of 39 students were given the opportunity to work at Time and Fortune magazines, CNN, Warner Bros. Studios, HBO, and Warner Music, among other divisions.

  • Program

    As part of an overall strategic review, the Rockefeller Foundation asked the National Committee to help it look at how China’s emergence affects the foundation’s strategies and goals. The China Project is an ongoing series of seminars and discussions begun in 2005 with the aim of providing the Foundation staff an opportunity to examine the global and regional impacts of China’s rise and its implications for Foundation programming around the world. The focus is on issues the Foundation staff identified as important to their programmatic goals.

  • Program

    The National Committee programmed a week-long trip to Beijing and Shanghai for Michael Moskow, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. Among other activities, he engaged Chinese economists and senior bankers at the People’s Bank and Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, lectured at the Central Party School and Tsinghua and Fudan Universities, and met with members of the American business community to discuss local concerns. 

  • Program

    The National Committee implemented an exchange program that provided a forum for museum professionals, specialists, and government officials in China and the United States to share experiences and ideas on how museums can best engage young audiences and serve as educational resources.

  • Program

    In 2006, the National Committee and Tsinghua University Center for Cultural Industry partnered to convene a U.S.-China Media/Culture Policy Forum in New York. American and Chinese media experts met to examine how national and local governments can successfully foster the development of media and cultural industries.

  • Program

    In February 2005, the National Committee brought seven Chinese legal aid professionals to the United States to spend five weeks examining the governance and administration of American professional legal service organizations.

  • Program

    In 2003, the Ford Foundation commissioned the National Committee to conduct a survey of programs addressing Sino-American relations and security issues. The resulting report was updated in 2005 and again in 2006.

  • Program

    Under the National Committee's auspices, a delegation of 17 young American political leaders — some serving in elected positions at the state or local level, others leaders of political organizations — visited the People's Republic of China in May 1977. Assembled with the cooperation of the American Council of Young Political Leaders, it was the first such visit of its kind.

  • Program

    Between 2000 and 2005, the National Committee held an essay contest in honor of the late scholar A. Doak Barnett. American and Chinese graduate students submitted 1,500-word essays on topics in U.S.-China relations, with authors of the best essays receiving rewards of $1,000.

  • Program

    George H.W. Bush and Deng Xiaoping met for the first time in October 1975, when an 18-member delegation of American leaders active in public education on world affairs visited China to discuss international issues.

  • Program

    Started in September 1984 as an off-the-record gathering of leading citizens of China and America, the U.S.-China Dialogue was the first formal instance of Track II diplomacy in the Sino-American relationship. It was held every 12-18 months, alternately in China and the United States, until 2002. 

  • Program

    Launched when only a trickle of Chinese graduate students and scholars came to the United States for study, the Scholar Orientation Program was created to supplement academic training that Chinese scholars received at U.S. institutions by providing them with greater exposure to America's history, culture, and key institutions.

  • Program

    In June 2007, the National Committee worked with long-time partner, the National League of Cities (NLC), and new partner, the League of California Cities (LCC) on a ten-day study tour to Beijing, Qingdao and Shanghai for mayors, city council members, and the NLC and LCC leadership.

  • Program

    In 2006, ten promising graduate students were selected from the United States to join with ten each from mainland China and Taiwan to participate in a National Committee's conflict resolution program.

  • Program

    The purpose of these seminars for mid-career U.S. military officers who have been fast-tracked for top leadership positions but do not focus on China in their daily work is to provide them with a background on China and to brief them on issues not conventionally covered in their military training — issues such as China's domestic politics, economic development, business and trade, foreign policy, rule of law, growth of civil society, environmental concerns and climate change, energy, and the use of soft power.

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