Program
In 1989, after the National People's Congress adopted legislation that permitted Chinese citizens to sue their government, the National Committee invited a delegation of seven Chinese legal experts — responsible for drafting legislation guiding government liability — to study the American legal system.
Program
The National Committee co-organized a conference with the School of Finance of Renmin University of China in Beijing in July 2006. The conference focused on the changing dynamics between China's central and provincial governments through the lens of fiscal reform.
Program
The National Committee’s Track II Strategic Security Dialogue (at times called the Northeast Asia Strategic Security Dialogue) began in 1999 and stemmed from an earlier National Committee mil/mil program and the joint Stanford-Harvard Preventive Defense Project (PDP), a research collaboration of Stanford University and Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government set up by former Secretary of Defense William Perry and Assistant Secretary Ash Carter.
Program
Started in September 1984 as an off-the-record gathering of leading citizens of China and America, the U.S.-China Dialogue was the first formal instance of Track II diplomacy in the Sino-American relationship. It was held every 12-18 months, alternately in China and the United States, until 2002. 
Program
In 2003, the Ford Foundation commissioned the National Committee to conduct a survey of programs addressing Sino-American relations and security issues. The resulting report was updated in 2005 and again in 2006.
Program
In June 2007, the National Committee worked with long-time partner, the National League of Cities (NLC), and new partner, the League of California Cities (LCC) on a ten-day study tour to Beijing, Qingdao and Shanghai for mayors, city council members, and the NLC and LCC leadership.
Program
The National Committee brought the first group of Chinese mayors and deputy mayors to U.S. soil in September, 1978. Led by Beijing Deputy Mayor Zhao Pengfei and Shanghai Deputy Mayor Yen Yumin, the 19-member delegation also included city planners, architects, and engineers. The visit was the first of approximately 50 exchanges the Committee has sponsored in the area of municipal and state/provincial management and planning.
Program
Fifty Schwarzman Scholars alumni from around the globe came together in Palo Alto to participate in a seminar exploring the role of technology in the U.S.-China relationship. Designed as a deep dive into Silicon Valley, the program included site visits to Google, Suning USA R&D Center, and Drive.ai, an autonomous vehicle company. Expert speakers included NCUSCR Director Jerry Yang, co-founder and former CEO of Yahoo!; Liu Zhen, senior vice president of ByteDance; and Hans Tung, managing partner at GGV Capital.
Program
The third healthcare dialogue was held in November 2018, bringing together experts in the field and representatives of major healthcare companies. The two sides discussed a wide range of topics, including medical technology development; health insurance reform and the role of the private sector; advancing value-based care models; public health; and areas of possible cooperation in healthcare between the United States and China.
Program
Following a cooling of relations in the early 1990s, the National Committee revitalized the U.S.-China military dialogue, sending a group of retired four-star generals and admirals to China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan in 1994 and 1996. Since then, the success of this program has continued to foster constructive exchange, in addition to inspiring other programs like the U.S.-China Strategic Security Dialogue.
Program
The National Committee's Time Warner Internship Program enabled fourth-year Fudan University students with an interest in journalism and media to participate in a three-month internship at various Time Warner entities in the United States. Over the course of the program's nine year span, a total of 39 students were given the opportunity to work at Time and Fortune magazines, CNN, Warner Bros. Studios, HBO, and Warner Music, among other divisions.
Program
Launched in 2018, this new initiative is designed to provide senior corporate leaders with a more holistic view of China, enabling them to better understand the issues faced by their U.S. and China-based staff; it is also designed to better equip them to engage in internal company discussions vis-à-vis China. The briefings touch on issues not routinely examined in the business world, including China’s domestic politics, foreign relations, rule of law, culture, and society.
Program
American and Chinese experts from academia, think tanks, and industry gather for a two-day dialogue exploring how significant climate change and energy developments are altering each country's energy outlook.
Program
The purpose of these seminars for mid-career U.S. military officers who have been fast-tracked for top leadership positions but do not focus on China in their daily work is to provide them with a background on China and to brief them on issues not conventionally covered in their military training — issues such as China's domestic politics, economic development, business and trade, foreign policy, rule of law, growth of civil society, environmental concerns and climate change, energy, and the use of soft power.
Program
Launched when only a trickle of Chinese graduate students and scholars came to the United States for study, the Scholar Orientation Program was created to supplement academic training that Chinese scholars received at U.S. institutions by providing them with greater exposure to America's history, culture, and key institutions.

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