Program
The U.S.-China Young Leaders Forum is an annual gathering of dozens of the "best and brightest" American and Chinese leaders under the age of forty from an eclectic mix of fields. Together, participants explore substantive issues and develop enduring friendships in a casual, intimate environment.
Program
Since 2004, the National Committee has been selecting twelve graduating U.S. high school seniors who have received national recognition for their accomplishments to participate in the yearly U.S.-China Student Leaders Exchange. For the young American participants, the heart of the program is a two-week study visit to China during the summer between high school and college. Americans participants learn about China's successes and challenges and have unusual opportunities to meet and exchange ideas with their Chinese counterparts as a consequence of homestays throughout most of the program.
Program
In April 1972, the National Committee made history by hosting the Chinese Table Tennis Team in round two of what became widely known as Ping Pong Diplomacy. The watershed visit — the first-ever of a delegation from the People's Republic of China to the United States — set the Committee on its path of becoming the pre-eminent exchange organization between the United States and China.
Program
To conclude the celebration of the National Committee’s 50th Anniversary, Chair Carla Hills led a delegation of board members and donors to Beijing for meetings with senior Chinese leaders and a reunion with almost 100 friends and past program participants.
Program
The Professional Fellows Program, funded by the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, is a two-way capacity building exchange for emerging NGO leaders in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan in the fields of the environment, legal aid, philanthropy, and community building among marginalized populations. The National Committee works with NGOs in the United States, China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan to carry out the program with a total of 28 Asian fellows and 14 American counterparts each year of the three-year cycle.
Program
In December 2018, experts from the American and Chinese governments, the legal field, and academia convened in Beijing to discuss important and timely issues, ranging from safeguarding human rights, including China’s governance in Xinjiang and U.S. immigration law, to government supervision and accountability, and legal protections for specific groups. The Americans also visited the Supreme People's Court, where they met with President Zhou Qiang, and observed a "virtual" civil trial at the Beijing Internet Court.
Program
The National Committee is now accepting application for the sixth round of its Public Intellectuals Program. Launched in 2005, PIP is dedicated to nurturing the next generation of China specialists who, in the tradition of earlier China hands, have the interest and potential to venture outside of academia to engage with the public and policy community. For more information and how to apply, please scroll to the bottom of this page. 
Program
This dialogue convenes American and Chinese legal experts to explore the issues surrounding China’s recent maritime disputes and escalated tensions in the Pacific, better understand the impact on regional and U.S.-China relations, and provide suggestions for improving the management and settlement of current disputes.
Program
The third healthcare dialogue was held in November 2018, bringing together experts in the field and representatives of major healthcare companies. The two sides discussed a wide range of topics, including medical technology development; health insurance reform and the role of the private sector; advancing value-based care models; public health; and areas of possible cooperation in healthcare between the United States and China.
Program
In January 2019, leading American and Chinese economists as well as business leaders met in New York City at a pivotal moment in the U.S.-China trade talks, to discuss the economic outlook for 2019 in each country; the Trump administration’s trade policies; prospects for a trade deal; technology competition and intellectual property issues; possible structural adjustments and changes in China’s economy; and directions for reform with respect to globalization and international organizations such as the World Trade Organization.

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