Public Event
At this program, Professor Wang Jisi, dean, School of International Studies, Peking University, reprised one of the themes raised in his 2005 Foreign Affairs article, “China’s Search for Stability with America,” (see the Sept/Oct 2005 Foreign Affairs issue) and focused on areas where Chinese and American interests converge and diverge in Asia.
Public Event
In his book, Rising Star: China’s New Security Diplomacy, Bates Gill, Freeman Chair in China Studies, Center for Strategic and International Studies, traces the shift in China’s security diplomacy to several factors, among them its concern with American primacy in the post-Cold War world, its vision for its own peaceful rise and the emergence of “new thinkers” in China who have provided the theoretical underpinnings for a more pragmatic approach.
Public Event
Susan Shirk highlighted some of the key themes of her book, China: Fragile Superpower, in a Washington discussion with members and guests of the National Committee and the World Affairs Council of Washington, DC.
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Jack Perkowski, chairman and CEO of ASIMCO Technologies, gave National Committee members and guests a snapshot view of his experiences in building an automotive parts business in China. Mr. Perkowski left behind a Wall Street career in the early 1990s to investigate business opportunities in China; he subsequently built ASIMCO into a leading company in China, with eight factories, 52 sales offices and 12,000 employees.
Public Event
Following a decision to bring greater transparency to process, the Chinese government started sending delegations abroad to give further clarification of policies adopted at the recent 17th Party Congress. While other delegations have been sent to Japan, Russia, the European Union and Southeast Asia, this particular delegation – with its three principal members having played instrumental roles in developing the policies for political reform that were set out at the Party Congress – came to the United States to give further explication to American China-watchers.
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Leadership changes announced at China’s 17th Party Congress are expected to give an indication of President Hu Jintao’s ability to consolidate his political power, as well as early signs of who may contend to succeed him as China’s top leader in five years’ time. Dr.
Public Event
Ted Plafker is a Beijing-based correspondent for The Economist. In his book, Doing Business in China: How to Profit in the World’s Fastest Growing Market, he highlights promising economic sectors, provides information on China’s legal landscape, and offers advice on how to promote and distribute products to Chinese consumers, among other topics.
Public Event
National Public Radio correspondent Rob Gifford traveled along China’s Route 312, from the dynamic metropolis of Shanghai to the remote border region with Kazakhstan. In China Road, Mr.
Public Event
In April 2007, the Council on Foreign Relations published the report of the independent task force it had convened to consider to a range of critical issues in the U.S.-China relationship. This distinguished group of specialists recommended that U.S.
Public Event
This public program examined had a “then and now” focus, as it examined how the work of foreign journalists in China has changed in the 35 years since the signing of the Shanghai Communique.
Public Event
Concern about the safety of products imported from China has added a new source of tension to U.S.-China trade relations.
Public Event
January 8, 2008 -David Denoon, an economist and political scientist on the faculty of New York University, gave National Committee members and guests an overview of the key findings of his recently published study, The Economic and Strategic Rise of China and India: Asian Realignments After the 1997 Financial Crisis. This public program was held on the evening of January 8 in New York.
Public Event
January 3, 2008 -How do academics and journalists write about China? How might they draw upon each others’ work in order to give Americans a more accurate picture of developments – current and historical – in China?
Public Event
December 11, 2007 - How do citizens in a rising China view the world? How do their views differ from those of Americans? And how do Americans and Chinese view each other? Andrew Kohut and Victor Yuan drew on public opinion surveys conducted by their respective organizations to identify similarities and differences in the international outlooks of American and Chinese citizens, and consider the implications for policy-makers in both countries.

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